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MingHe D3806 Buck-Boost DC-DC Converter

DC-DC Converter
DC-DC Converter

Here’s a useful buck-boost DC-DC converter from eBay, this one will do 36v DC at 6A maximum output current. Voltage & current are selected on the push buttons, when the output is enabled either the output voltage or the output current can be displayed in real time.

Display PCB
Display PCB

Here’s the display PCB, which also has the STM32 microcontroller that does all the magic. There appears to be a serial link on the left side, I’ve not yet managed to get round to hooking it into a serial adaptor to see if there’s anything useful on it.

Display Drive & Microcontroller
Display Drive & Microcontroller

The bottom of the board holds the micro & the display multiplexing glue logic.

Main PCB
Main PCB

Not much on the mainboard apart from the large switching inductors & power devices. There’s also a SMPS PWM controller, probably being controlled from the micro.

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Sony Xperia T Teardown

Back Cover Removed
Back Cover Removed

Since this phone has been in my drawer for some time, I figured it was time for a teardown. (It’s never going to see any more use).
The back cover on these phones is easily removed, as it’s just clipped on.

Motherboard
Motherboard

Once the back cover is removed, the Li-Polymer cell is exposed, along with the logic board. Pretty much all of the PCB is under RF shields.

Motherboard Removed
Motherboard Removed
Battery Management
Battery Management

Under the small RF can on the back of the board is the battery management circuitry & the charger. There’s an extra connection to the cell for temperature monitoring. Just under that circuitry is the eMMC flash storage.
Just to the left of the battery circuit is the NFC transceiver IC, from NXP.

Battery Flex
Battery Flex

The cell is connected to the main board with a FFC, with a very small SMT connector, although not as small as the more modern Xperia series phones.

RF Section
RF Section

The other side of the mainboard holds the large RF transceiver section, with a Qualcomm RTR8600 multiband transceiver IC. In the bottom corner is a Skyworks SKY77351-32 Quad-band power amplifier IC, along with 3 other power amplifier ICs, also from Skyworks.

Gyro & Audio Codec
Gyro & Audio Codec

The top corner of the board holds the various sensors, including an Invensense MPU-3050 3-axis gyro. To the right of that is the Audio Codec, a WCD9310 from Qualcomm.

Logic & CPU Section
Logic & CPU Section

Everything is controlled from the last section on the board, with the main CPU & RAM in a PoP (Package-On-Package) configuration. Under the main CPU is the main power management IC, also from Qualcomm. No datasheet for this one unfortunately, but it gives it’s purpose away by being surrounded by large inductors & capacitors.

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TS100 12-24v Soldering Iron

Handle
Handle

When I ordered the tiny USB soldering iron, I decided a proper iron upgrade would be a good idea. Looking around for something that didn’t require AC mains power turned up the TS100, a Chinese design, that unusually is actually very good! Above is the handle itself, with it’s small OLED display & two operation buttons.
This iron is controlled by a STM32 ARM microcontroller, the firmware & schematics are completely open-source.

DC Input Jack / USB Port
DC Input Jack / USB Port

The bottom end of the iron has the main DC input jack, designed with laptop chargers in mind (DC input range from 10v-24v). Above that is the micro USB port for programming.

Heating Element Socket
Heating Element Socket

The iron tips slot into the other end, many different tip types & shapes are available. The one supplied was the simple conical tip.

Standby Screen
Standby Screen

Plugging the iron into some power gets a standby screen – it doesn’t just start heating immediately, for safety.

Heating
Heating

The left hand button starts the heater, which on a 24v input voltage gets to operating temperature well within 10 seconds.

Temperature Stable
Temperature Stable

The right hand screen icon changes when the temperature has stabilized. The control PCB has an integrated accelerometer, leaving the iron hot for a few minutes triggers a timeout & it powers down. Once picked up again, the heater instantly restarts.
The operating temperature is adjustable with the pair of buttons, from 100°C to 400°C.

Different Bits
Different Bits

Here’s a selection of bits for the iron. The design is very similar to the Hakko T15 series of irons, but these are a much shorter version. Like the Hakko versions, the actual tips aren’t replaceable, once the bit burns out, the entire assembly is replaced.

TS100 Soldering Iron
TS100 Soldering Iron

Here’s the iron fully assembled. The entire device is about the same length as just the heating element from a Hakko T15!