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Wouxun KG-UV950P Teardown & Analysis

Following on from my review, here are some internal views & detail on the components used in this radio. Below is an overview of the main PCB with the top plate removed from the radio.

Cover Removed
Cover Removed
RF Final Amplifier Stage
RF Final Amplifier Stage

Most visible are these MOSFETs, which are Mitsubishi RD70HVF1 VHF/UHF power devices.  Rated for a maximum of 75W output power at 12.5v (absolute maximum of 150W, these are used well within their power ratings. They are joined to the PCB with heavy soldering, with bypass caps tacked right on to the leads.

RF Pre Drivers
RF Pre Drivers

Here is the RF pre-driver stage, with intermediate transistors hidden under the small brass heatspreader.

Power Section
Power Section

In the top left corner of the radio, near the power input leads, is the power supply & audio amplifier section. Clearly visible are the pair of LA4425A 5W audio power amplifier ICs, these drive the speakers on the top of the radio. Either side of these parts are a 7809 & a 7805 – both linear regulators providing +9v & +5v logic supplies respectively. The large TO220 package device is a KIA378R08PI 3A LDO regulator with ON/OFF control, this one outputs +8v. Just visible in the top right corner are the sockets for the speaker connections.

DTMF Circuits
DTMF Circuits

Here are the two ICs for dealing with DTMF tones, they are HM9170 receivers.

Glue Logic
Glue Logic

In the corner next to the interface jack, there are some CD4066B Quad Bilateral switches. These make sense since the interface jack has more than a single purpose, these will switch signals depending on what is connected.

RF Section
RF Section

Here are visible the RF cans for the oscillators, the crystals visible next to the can at the top. The shields are soldered on, so no opening these unfortunately.
Also visible in this image is a CMX138A Audio Scrambler & Sub-Audio Signalling processor. This IC deals with the Voice Inversion Scrambling feature of the radio, & processes the incoming audio before being sent to the modulator.

Output Filter Network
Output Filter Network

Shown here is the RF output filter network, this radio uses relays for switching instead of PIN diodes, I imagine for cost reasons. The relay closest to the RF output socket has had a slight accident 🙂 This is slated to be replaced soon.

RF Output Jack
RF Output Jack

Finally, the RF output jack.

Audio Speakers
Audio Speakers

Here the speakers are shown, attached to the bottom of the top plate. They are both rated 8Ω 1W.

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Precision 10v & 5v Reference

After watching a video over at Scullcom Hobby Electronics on YouTube, I figured I’d build one of these precision references to calibrate my multimeters.

It’s based around a REF102P 10v precision reference & an INA105P precision unity gain differential amplifier.

For full information, check out the video, I won’t go into the details here, just my particular circuit & PCB layout.

In the video, Veroboard is used. I’m not too fond of the stuff personally. I find it far too easy to make mistakes & it never quite looks good enough. To this end I have spun a board in Eagle, as usual.

Precision Ref SCH
Precision Ref SCH – Click to Embiggen

Here’s the schematic layout, the same as is in the video.

Precision Ref BRD
Precision Ref BRD

As usual, the Eagle CAD layout files can be found at the bottom of the post.

And the associated PCB layout. I have added the option to be able to tweak the output, to get a more accurate calibration, which can be added by connecting JP1 on the PCB.

As in the original build, this unit uses pre-built DC-DC converter & Li-Ion charger modules. A handy Eagle library can be found online for these parts.
I have however left off the battery monitor section of the circuit, since I plan to use a protected lithium cell for power. This also allowed me to keep the board size down, & use a single sided layout.

Toner Transfer Paper
Toner Transfer Paper

Here’s the track layout ready to iron onto the copper clad board. I use the popular toner transfer system with special paper from eBay, this stuff has a coating that allows the toner to easily be transferred to the PCB without having to mess about with soaking in water & scraping paper off.

Ironed On
Ironed On

Here’s the paper having just been ironed onto the copper. After waiting for the board to cool off the paper is peeled off, leaving just the toner on the PCB.

Etched PCB
Etched PCB

PCB just out of the etch tank, drilled & with the solder pins for the modules installed. Only one issue with the transfer, in the bottom left corner of the board is visible, a very small section of copper was over etched.
This is easily fixed with a small piece of wire.

Components Populated
Components Populated

Main components populated. The DC-DC converter is set at 24v output, which the linear regulator then drops down to the +15v rail for the reference IC. The linear section of the regulator, along with the LC filter on the output of the switching regulator produce a low-ripple supply.

SMPS Ripple
SMPS Ripple

Here’s the scope reading the AC ripple on the output of the DC-DC converter. Scale is 100mV/Div. Roughly 150mV of ripple is riding on top of the DC rail.

Linear PSU Ripple
Linear PSU Ripple

And here’s the output from the linear regulator, scale of 50mV/Div. Ripple has been reduced to ~15mV for the reference IC.
In total the circuit as built has a power consumption of ~0.5W, most of which is being dissipated as heat in the linear part of the PSU.

[download id=”5583″]

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AD9850 VFO Board

Continuing from my previous post where I published an Eagle design layout for AD7C‘s Arduino powered VFO, here is a completed board.

I have made some alterations to the design since posting, which are reflected in the artwork download in that post, mainly due to Eagle having a slight psychotic episode making me ground one of the display control signals!

AD9850 VFO
AD9850 VFO

The amplifier section is unpopulated & bypassed as I was getting some bad distortion effects from that section, some more work is needed there.
The Arduino Pro Mini is situated under the display, and the 5v rail is provided by the LM7805 on the lower left corner.

Current draw at 12v input is 150mA, for a power of 1.8W total. About 1W of this is dissipated in the LM7805 regulator, so I have also done a layout with an LM2574 Switching Regulator.
The SMPS version should draw a lot let power, as less is being dissipated in the power supply, but this version is more complex.

DDS VFO-SMPS
DDS VFO-SMPS

Here the SMPS circuit can be seen on the left hand side of the board, completely replacing the linear regulator.
I have not yet built this design, so I don’t know what kind of effect this will have on the output signal, versus the linear regulator. I have a feeling that the switching frequency of the LM2574 (52kHz) might produce some interference on the output of the DDS module. However I have designed this section to the standards in the datasheet, so this should be minimal.

Nevertheless this version is included in the Downloads section at the bottom of this post.

The output coupled through a 100nF capacitor is very clean, as can be seen below, outputting a 1kHz signal. Oscilloscope scale is 0.5ms/div & 1V/div.

VFO Output
VFO Output (Mucky ‘Scope)
Scope Connected
Scope Connected

 

Thanks again to Rich over at AD7C for the very useful tool design!

Linked below is the Eagle design files for this project, along with my libraries used to create it.

[download id=”5571″]

[download id=”5573″]

[download id=”5575″]