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Uniden UBC92XLT Teardown

One bit of my equipment that I’ve never looked into is my scanner, a handheld Uniden unit. I got this when Maplin Electronics had them on special offer a few years ago.

Uniden Scanner
Uniden Scanner

Here’s the scanner itself, roughly the same size as a usual HT.

Back Cover Removed
Back Cover Removed

Here the back cover has been removed, and the main RF board is visible at the top of the stack. Unfortunately the shielding cans are soldered on this unit, so no looking under there 🙁
On the right hand side of the board next to the antenna input is the main RF filter network, and it’s associated switching. The RF front end is under the shield closest to the front edge.

Controls & 3.3v Regulator
Controls & 3.3v Regulator

On the other side of the PCB is the Volume & Squelch potentiometers, along with a dedicated 3.3v switching supply. An NJM2360A High Precision DC/DC converter IC controls this one. A 3.3v test point is visible next to the regulator.

RF Board Reverse
RF Board Reverse

Here’s the backside of the RF board, some more interesting parts here. There’s a pair of NJM3404A Single Supply Dual Op-Amp ICs, and a TK10931V Dual AM/FM IF Discriminator IC. This is the one that does all the back-end radio functionality. The audio amplifier for the internal speaker & external headphone jack is also on this PCB, top left. A board-to-board interconnect links this radio board with the main control board underneath.

Control PCB Front
Control PCB Front

Here’s the front of the control PCB, nothing much to see here, just the LCD & membrane keypad contacts.

Control PCB Reverse
Control PCB Reverse

And here’s the reverse side of the control board. All the interesting bits are here. The main microcontroller is on the right, a Renesas M38D59GF, a fairly powerful MCU, with onboard LCD drive, A/D converter, serial interface, 60K of ROM & 2K of RAM. It’s 6.143MHz clock crystal is just below it.
The mating connector for the RF board is in the centre here.

There is also a Microchip 24LC168 16KB I²C EEPROM next to the main microcontroller. This is probably for storing user settings, frequencies, etc.

EEPROM
EEPROM

The rest of this board is dedicated to battery charging and power supply, in the centre is a dual switching controller, I can’t figure out the numbers on the tiny SOT23 components in here, but this is dealing with the DC 6v input & to the left of that is the circuitry for charging the NiMH cells included with the scanner.

PSU
PSU

The last bit of this PCB is a BU2092FV Serial In / Parallel Out 4 channel driver. Not sure what this one is doing, it might be doing some signal multiplexing for the RF board interface. Unfortunately the tracks from this IC are routed on the inner layers of the board so they can’t be traced out.

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uRadMonitor – Node Online!

It’s official. I’m now part of the uRadMonitor network, & assisting in some of the current issues with networking some people (including myself) have been having.

It seems that the uRadMonitor isn’t sending out technically-valid DHCP requests, here is what Wireshark thinks of the DHCP on my production network hardware setup:

WireShark Screencap
WireShark Screencap

As can be seen, the monitor unit is sending a DHCP request of 319 bytes, where a standard length DHCP Request packet should be ~324 bytes, as can be seen on the below screen capture.

Valid DHCP
Valid DHCP

This valid one was generated from the same SPI Ethernet module as the monitor, (Microchip ENC28J60) connected to an Arduino. Standard example code from the EtherCard library was used to set up the DHCP. The MAC address of the monitor was also cloned to this setup to rule out the possibility of that being the root cause.

My deductive reasoning in this case points to the firmware on the monitor being at fault, rather than the SPI ethernet hardware, or my network hardware. Radu over at uRadMonitor is looking into the firmware being at fault.

Strangely, most routers don’t seem to have an issue with the monitor, as connecting another router on a separate subnet works fine, and Wireshark doesn’t even complain about an invalid DHCP packet, although it’s exactly the same.

Working DHCP
Working DHCP

As the firmware for the devices isn’t currently available for me to pick apart & see if I can find the fault, it’s up to Radu to get this fixed at the moment.

Now, for a µTeardown:

uRadMonitor
uRadMonitor

Here is the monitor, a small aluminium box, with power & network.

PCB
PCB

Removing 4 screws in the end plate reveals the PCB, with the Geiger-Mueller tube along the top edge. My personal serial number is also on the PCB.
The ethernet module is on the right, with the DC barrel jack.

PCB Bottom
PCB Bottom

Here is the bottom of the PCB, with the control MCU & the tiny high voltage inverter for the Geiger tube.

Control Electronics
Control Electronics

A Closeup of the main MCU, an ATMega328p

Logo
Logo

PCB Logo. Very artsy 😉

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Water Management System PCB Revisions

OK, a few revisions have been made to the water management PCB, mainly to reduce the possibility of the brushed DC motors in the water pumps from causing the MCU to crash, with the other changes to the I/O connector positioning & finally upgrading the reverse blocking diode to a 10A capable version rather than 5A.

Water Management PCB
Water Management PCB

Thanks to Mayhew Labs with the WebGerber image generator for the render.