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3M Microtouch 17″ Raspberry Pi Touch PC

A while back I posted about a 3M Touch Systems industrial monitor that I’d been given. I had previously paired it with a Raspberry Pi Model B+, but for general desktop use it was just a little on the slow side.

Since the release of the Raspberry Pi 2, with it’s 4-core ARM Cortex CPU, things are much improved, so I figured I’d post an update with the latest on the system.

The monitor I’ve used is a commercial one, used in such things as POS terminals, service kiosks, etc. It’s a fairly old unit, but it’s built like a tank.

3M Panel
3M Panel

It’s built around a Samsung LTM170EI-A01 System-On-Panel, these are unusual in that all the control electronics & backlighting are built into the panel itself, instead of requiring an external converter board to take VGA to the required LVDS that LCD panels use for their interface.

The touch section is a 3M Microtouch EXII series controller, with a surface capacitive touch overlay.

Touch Controller
Touch Controller

Above is the touch controller PCB, with it’s USB-Serial converter to interface with the Pi.

As there is much spare space inside the back of this monitor, I have mounted the Pi on a couple of spare screw posts, fitted USB ports where the original VGA & Serial connectors were in the casing, and added voltage regulation to provide the Pi with it’s required 5v.

Overview
Overview

Here’s the entire back of the panel, the Pi in the middle interfaces with a HDMI-VGA adaptor for the monitor, and the serial adaptor on the right for the touch. A small voltage regulator at the bottom of the unit is providing the 5v rail. There’s a switch at the bottom next to one of the USB ports to control power to the Pi itself. The panel won’t detect the resolution properly if they’re both powered on at the same time.

At 13.8v, the device pulls about 2A from the supply, which seems to be typical for a CCFL backlighted LCD.
Now the Raspberry Pi 2 has been released, it’s much more responsive for desktop applications, especially with a slight overclock.

Shameless Plug
Shameless Plug

A full disk image enabled for Desktop & 3M touch monitors is available below for others that have similar panels. This image only works for the Pi 2!

[download id=”5591″]

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Dell SE197FPf Monitor 12v Conversion

My other monitors are a different model, and have a slightly different main PCB inside, but the process is mostly the same for converting these to 12v supply.

Main PCB
Main PCB

In this monitor type, there is only a single board, with all the PSU & logic, instead of separate boards for each function.

PSU Closeup
PSU Closeup

This monitor is slightly different in it’s power supply layout. The mains supply provides only a single 12v rail, which is then stepped down by a switching converter to 5v, then by smaller linear regulators to 3.3v & 1.8v for the logic. This makes my life easier since I don’t have to worry about any power conversion at all.

PCB Reverse
PCB Reverse

Here’s the backside of the PCB, the mains PSU section is in the centre.

Attachment Points
Attachment Points

Here’s the pair of 12v supply wires soldered onto the main board, onto the common GND connection on the left, and the main +12v rail on the right. I’ve not bothered with colour coding the wiring here, just used whatever I had to hand that was heavy enough to cope with a couple amps.

12v Socket
12v Socket

A small mod later with a cone drill & the 12v input socket is mounted in the LCD frame.

Casing Mod
Casing Mod

Some light removal of plastic & the back cover fits back on. Current draw at 13.8v is ~2A.

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Dell E207WFPc Monitor 12v Conversion

I’m still on my crusade of removing every trace of 240v mains power from my shack, so next up are my computer monitors.

I have 4 Dell monitors, of various models, hooked up to my main PC.

The monitor here is a Dell E207WFPc 20″ widescreen model. There will be more when I manage to get the others apart to do the conversion. However I’m hoping that the PSU boards are mostly the same.

Panel Removed
Panel Removed

There are no screws holding these monitors together, the front bezel is simply clicked into place in the back casing, these clips are the only thing that holds the relatively heavy glass LCD panel & it’s supporting frame! The image above shows the panel removed. The large board on the left is the power supply & backlight inverter, the smaller one on the right is the interface board to convert the DVI or VGA to LVDS for the LCD panel itself.

PSU Board
PSU Board

Here’s a closeup of the PSU board, the connector at centre right at the top of the PCB is the main power output, and also has a couple of signals to control the backlight inverter section of the PSU, on the left side. The PSU requirements for this monitor are relatively simple, at 14.5v for the backlight & 5v for the logic board.

PSU
PSU

Here’s the top of the PSU board, very simple with the mains supply on the right side, and the backlight inverter transformers on the left.

Hooked In
Hooked In

Here I’ve hooked into the power rails on the supply, to attach my own 12v regulators. The green wire is +14.5v, and the purple is +5v. Black is common ground.

5v Regulator
5v Regulator

On doing some testing, the backlight inverter section doesn’t seem to mind voltages between 11.5-14.5v, so a separate regulator isn’t required there. Even running off batteries that’s within the range of both charging & discharging. The only regulator required is a 5v one to reduce the input voltage for the logic PCB.

First Test
First Test

On applying some 12v power to the regulator input, we have light! Current draw at 12.5v is 2.65A for a power consumption of 33W.

12v Input
12v Input

There’s plenty of room in the back casing to mount a 12v input socket, I have left the mains supply intact so it can be used on dual supply.

Final Wiring
Final Wiring

Here’s the 5v regulator mounted on the back of the casing, all wired up & ready to go.