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Evening Musing – Linux RAID Rebuilding

My main bulk storage for the home LAN is a bank of 4TB drives, set up in a large RAID6 array. Due to a brownout this evening on the +12v supply for one of the disk banks, I’ve had to start rebuilding two of the disks.

Core NAS
Core NAS

The total array size is 28TB after parity – 9 4TB disks in total. The disks are connected through USB3 to the file server.

mdadm Detail
mdadm Detail

Here’s the current status of the array. Two of the disks decided that they wouldn’t rejoin the array, so they got their superblocks cleared & readded manually. This forced the array into rebuilding.

Rebuild Progress
Rebuild Progress

Rebuilding an array of this size takes a while, as can be seen from the image above, it’s going to take about 7200 minutes, or 5.2 days.

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Netgear GS308 Gigabit Switch

Here’s a new addition to the network, mainly to replace the ancient Cisco Catalyst 3500 XL 100MB switch I’ve been using for many years, until I can find a decently priced second hand commercial gigabit switch.

Operational
Operational

Here’s the switch with some network connections on test. So far it’s very stable & draws minimum power. I’ve not yet attempted to run my core links (NAS) through yet, as I’ve not yet seen a consumer grade switch that can stand up to constant full load without crashing.

Internals
Internals

Here’s the switch with it’s lid popped. The magnetics can be seen at the back, next to the RJ-45 ports, the large IC in the centre is the main switching IC, with a heatsink bonded to the top. Very minimal design, with only a couple of switching regulators for power supply & not much else.

Power & EEPROM
Power & EEPROM

Here’s a closeup of some of the support components. There’s a 25MHz crystal providing a clock signal for the switch IC, just to the right of that is an EEPROM. I imagine this is storing the switch configuration & MAC address. Further right is one of the switching DC-DC converter ICs for power.

As a quick test, here’s 500GB of data being shifted through the switch, at quite an impressive rate. I’m clearly maxing out the bandwidth of the link here. Soon I will upgrade to a 10G Ethernet link between the NAS & main PC to get some more performance.

Test
Test

The Shack

The Shack

So, here is where all the action happens.

Main radio of course is housed on the left, it’s partially hidden under my currently over-populated breadboard.

All 3 monitors are linked to the same PC, using a pair of video cards. This is a very flexible system with so much screen real estate.

Main system power is provided by the pair of power supplies next to the radio – these are homebrew units using surplus switched mode PSU boards. Check my previous posts for more details.

Power Supplies
Power Supplies

The main power supply system. These two supplies are cross connected, giving a total DC amperage of 30A at 13.8v. There is also a link to a large 220Ah lead-acid battery bank (orange cable), to keep me on the air during power outages. This cable is getting upgraded to something more beefy shortly. The white cable is currently supplying power to my online radiation monitor.
The main high-current DC outputs are the Speakon connectors next to the meters. The top one is powering the radio directly, the bottom is linked through to my 12v distribution box for lower current loads, such as the oscilloscope, audio amplifiers, tools, etc.

Radiation Monitor
Radiation Monitor

Attached to the side of the desk is the radiation monitor itself.

Core NAS
Core NAS

Under the radio is the core NAS of the network. It’s an array of 9 4TB disks, in RAID6, giving a total capacity after parity of 28TB. This provides storage & services to every other machine in the shack, the Raspberry Pi on top of the disk array is doing general network housekeeping & monitoring, also generating the graphs for the Radiation Monitor page. A Cisco 48-port switch is partially out of frame on the right, providing 100MB Ethernet to the devices that don’t require gigabit.