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HPI Savage X 4.6 Ignition Conversion – Initial Carburettor Settings & Module Mountings

Ignition Module Mount
Ignition Module Mount
Ignition Module
Ignition Module

The engine now with it’s required ignition sensor, it is now mounted back on the chassis of the model. I have replaced the stock side exhaust with a rear silencer, so I could fit the ignition module in place next to the engine.
For the mounting, I fabricated a pair of brackets from 0.5mm aluminium, bent around the module & secured with the screws that attach the engine bed plate to the TVPs. The ignition HT lead can be routed up in front of the rear shock tower to clear all moving suspension parts, with the LT wiring tucked into the frame under the engine.
In this location the module is within the profile of the model chassis so it shouldn’t get hit by anything in service.

Rear Exhaust
Rear Exhaust

New exhaust silencer fitted to the back of the model. This saves much space on the side of the model & allows the oily exhaust to be discharged away from the back wheel – no more mess to wipe up.

Kill Switch
Kill Switch

The ignition switch fitted into the receiver box. This is wired into channel 3 of the TF-40 radio, allowing me to remotely kill the engine in case of emergency. I have fitted a 25v 1000µF capacitor to smooth out any power fluctuations from the ignition module.
The radio is running from a 11.1v 1Ah 3S LiPo pack connected to a voltage regulator to give a constant 6.5v for the electronics. I found this is much more reliable than the standard 5-cell Ni-MH hump packs.

Fuel Tank
Fuel Tank

The stock silicone fuel tubing has been replaced with Tygon tubing to withstand the conversion to petrol.

High Speed Needle
High Speed Needle

High speed needle tweaked to provide a basic running setting on petrol. This is set to ~1.5mm below flush with the needle housing.

Low Speed Needle
Low Speed Needle

Low speed needle tweaked to provide a basic running setting on petrol. This is set to ~1.73mm from flush with the needle housing.

As petrol is a much higher energy density fuel, it requires much more air than the methanol glow fuel – ergo much leaner settings.
The settings listed should allow an engine to run – if nowhere near perfectly as they are still rather rich. It’s a good starting point for eventual tuning.

 

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DIY Valve Amplifier – Part 1 – Amplifier Section

Components
Components

Here are a few details of a valve amplifier I am building, using the valve related parts from a 1960’s reel to reel tape recorder.

This amplifier is based on an a Mullard ECL82 triode/pentode valve, with an EM84 magic eye tube for level indication.

Beginnings Of The Amplifier
Beginnings Of The Amplifier

Here the first components are being soldered to the tags on the valve holder, there are so few components that a PCB is not required, everything can be rats-nested onto the valve holders.

Progress
Progress

Progressing with the amplifier section componentry, all resistors are either 1/2W or 2W.

Valve Sockets Fitted
Valve Sockets Fitted

Here the valve holders have been fitted, along with the output transformer, DC smoothing capacitor & the filament wiring, into the top of the plastic housing. At this point all the components that complete the amplifier section are soldered to the bottom of the right hand valve holder.

Wiring
Wiring

Starting the wiring between the valves & the power supply components. The volume control pot is fitted between the valve holders.

Valves Test Fit
Valves Test Fit

The valves here are test fitted into their sockets, the aluminium can at the back is a triple 32uF 250v electrolytic capacitor for smoothing the B+ rail.

Amplifier Section First Test
Amplifier Section First Test

First test of the amplifier, with the speaker from the 1960’s tape recorder from which the valves came from. the 200v DC B+ supply & the 6.3v AC filament supply is derived from the mains transformer in the background.

Magic Eye Tube Added
Magic Eye Tube Added

Here the magic eye tube has been fitted & is getting it’s initial tuning to the amplifier section. This requires selecting combinations of anode & grid resistors to set the gap between the bars while at no signal & picking a coupling RC network to give the desired response curve.

Final Test
Final Test

Here both valves are fitted & the unit is sitting on it’s case for final audio testing. the cathodes of the ECL82 can be clearly seen glowing dull red here.

 

In the final section, I will build a SMPS power supply into the unit to allow it to be powered from a single 12v DC power supply.

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Safe 4 Tumbler Combination Lock

Combination Lock
Combination Lock
Combination Lock

Just a very quick post with some images of an industrial safe combination lock.

Tumblers Aligned
Tumblers Aligned

Here the tumblers are lined up to allow the lock to open.

Bolt Locked
Bolt Locked

The locking bar has dropped into the slots in the tumbler plates & engaged with the cam.

Bolt Unlocked
Bolt Unlocked

Rotating the cam pulls the bolt into the lock, allowing the door to open.

Unlocked
Unlocked

The dial screws into the cam plate to allow the mechanism to be operated.