Cree XML-T6 x5 LED Torch

Here’s another torch from eBay, this time with 5 Cree XML-T6 LEDs.

Label
Label

Having 5 Cree LEDs rated at up to 3A a piece, this light has the capacity to draw about 50W from it’s power supply. In this case though, current draw is about 1.5A at 12v input on the full brightness setting.

Cree LED Torch
Cree LED Torch

Here’s the LEDs mounted into the reflector. Fitting this many high power LEDs into a small space requires some serious heatsinking. The casing is made of machined aluminium.

LED Module
LED Module

Unscrewing the front bezel allows the internals to come out. The core frame & reflector is all cast alloy as well, for heatsinking the LEDs. The controller PCB is mounted into a recess in the back of the LED mount.

Controller
Controller

Here’s the controller itself. The usual small microcontroller is present, for the multiple modes, and handling the momentary power switch.

Switching Inductor
Switching Inductor

As all the LEDs on this torch are connected in series, their forward voltage is ~12-15v. The battery is an 8.4v Li-Ion pack, so some boost conversion is required. This is handled by the circuitry on the other side of the board, with this large power inductor.

Reflector
Reflector

The reflector screws onto the front of the LED array, centered in place with some plastic grommets around the LEDs themselves.

LED Array
LED Array

Finally for the torch, the LED array itself. This is attached to the frame with some thermal adhesive, and the LEDs themselves are mounted on an aluminium-core PCB for better heat transfer.
This module unsurprisingly generates quite some heat, so I have improved the thermal transfer to the outer case with some thermal grease around the outer edge.

Charger
Charger

The supplied charger is the usual Chinese cheapy affair, claiming an output current of 1A at 8.4v. I never use these chargers, so they get butchered instead.

Charger PCB
Charger PCB

Here’s the main PCB. Overall the construction isn’t that bad, the input mains is full-wave rectified, but there is little in the way of RFI filtering. The supply is fused, but with an absolutely tiny glass affair that I seriously doubt has the ability to clear a large fault current.
Like many cheap supplies, the output wiring is very thin, it’s capacity to carry 1A is questionable.

PCB Reverse
PCB Reverse

On the reverse side, there’s a nice large gap between the mains side & the low voltage output. There’s even an anti-tracking slot under the optoisolator.

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