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Jaguar S-Type Aux Heater / Webasto Thermo Top V Part 1 – Teardown & Cleaning

Jag Label
Jag Label

Here’s another Diesel-fired heater related project – these Webasto heaters are fitted to Jaguar S-Type cars as auxiliary heaters, since (according to the Jag manual), the modern fuel-efficient diesels produce so little waste heat that extra help is required to run the car’s climate control system. (Although this seems to nullify any fuel efficiency boost, as the fuel saved by not producing so much waste heat in the engine itself is burned in an aux heater to provide heat anyway). The unfortunate part is these units don’t respond to applying +12v to Pin 1 of the ECU to get them to start – they are programmed to respond to CAN Bus & K-Line Bus only, so they require a bit more effort to get going. They also don’t have a built-in water circulation pump unlike the Webasto Thermo Top C heaters – they expect the water flow to be taken care of by the engine’s coolant pump.

Webasto Label
Webasto Label
Water Side
Water Side

The water ports are on the side of this heater instead of the end, the heat exhanger is on the left. These hearers are fitted to the car under the left front wing, behind a splash guard. Pretty easy to get to but they get exposed to all the road dirt, water & salt so corrosion is a little problem. The fuel dosing pump is in a much more difficult spot to get at – it’s under the car next to the fuel tank on the right hand side. Access to the underside with stands is required to get at this.

ECU Side
ECU Side

The ECU side has all the other connections – Combustion air, exhaust, fuel, power & control.

External Connectors
External Connectors

Only two of the external connectors are used on these heaters, the large two pin one is for main power – heavy cable required here as the current draw can climb to ~30A on startup while the glow plug fires. The 8-pin connector on the left is the control connector, where the CAN / K-Line / W-Bus buses live. The fuel dosing pump is also supplied from a pin on this connector. The small 3-pin under that is a blank for a circulation pump where fitted. Pinouts are here:

PinSignal
1Battery Positive
2Battery Negative
Pin NumberSignalNotes
1Telestart / Heater EnableWould usually start the heater with a simple +12v ON signal, but is disabled in these heaters.
2W-Bus / K-LineDiagnostic Serial Bus Or Webasto Type 1533 Programmer / Clock
3External Temp Sensor
4CAN-CAN Bus Low
5Fuel Dosing PumpFuel Pump output. Connect pump to this pin & ground. Polarity unimportant.
6Solenoid ValveFuel cutoff solenoid optionally fitted here.
7CAN+CAN Bus High
8Cabin Heater Fan ControlThis output switches on when heater reaches +50°C to control car heater blower
PinSignalNotes
1??
2Circulation Pump +
3Circulation Pump -
ECU Cover Removed
ECU Cover Removed

Removing the clipped-on plastic cover reveals the other ECU connectors. The large white one feeds the glow plug, & the large multi-pin below brings in the temp & overheat sensor signals.

MC9S12DT128B Microcontroller
MC9S12DT128B Microcontroller

The heart of the ECU is a massive microcontroller, a Freescale MC9S12DT128B, attached to a daughterboard hooked into the ECU power board.

Power Section
Power Section

The high power section is on the board just under the connectors, here all the large semiconductors live for switching the fan motor, glow plug, external loads, etc.

LIN & CAN Bus Transceivers
LIN & CAN Bus Transceivers

The bus transceivers are separate ICs on the control board, a TJA1041 takes care of the CAN bus. There’s also a TJA1020 LIN bus transceiver here, which is confusing since none of the Webasto documentation mentions LIN bus control.

Combustion Fan Motor
Combustion Fan Motor

The combustion fan motor is in the ECU compartment, nicely sealed away from the elements. There is no speed sensor on these blowers, unlike the Eberspacher ones.

Motor Details
Motor Details

The motor is a Buhler, rated at 10.5v.

Water Ports & Combustion Fan Cover
Water Ports & Combustion Fan Cover

Unclipping the cover from the other end reveals the combustion fan, it’s under the black cover. (These are side-channel blowers, to provide the relatively high static pressure required to run the burner).

Sensor Clip
Sensor Clip

The overheat & temperature sensors are on the end of the heat exchanger, retained by a stainless clip.

Temp & Overheat Sensors
Temp & Overheat Sensors

With the clip removed, the sensors can be seen better. There’s some pretty bad corrosion of the aluminium alloy on the end sensor, it’s seized in place.

Burner
Burner

The heater splits in half to reveal the evaporative burner itself. I’ve already cleaned the black crud off with a wire brush here, doesn’t look like this heater has seen much use as it’s pretty clean inside.

Burner Chamber
Burner Chamber

Inside the burner the fuel evaporates & is ignited. There is a brass mesh behind the backplate of the burner to assist with vaporisation.

Glow Plug
Glow Plug

The glow plug is fitted into the side of the burner ceramic here. This is probably a Silicon Carbide device. It also acts as a flame sensor when the heater has fired up. The fuel inlet line is to the left under the clamp.

Heat Exhanger
Heat Exhanger

The hot gases from the burner flow into the heat exchanger here, with many fins to increase the surface area. There’s only a couple of mm coating of carbon here, after 10 years on the car I would have expected it to be much more clogged.

I’m currently waiting on some components to build an interface so I can get the Webasto Thermo Test software to talk to the heater. Once this is done I can see if there are any faults logged that need sorting before I can get this heater running, but from the current state it seems to be pretty good visually. More to come once parts arrive!

The full service manual for these heaters can be grabbed from here, along with the wiring details for the Jaguar implementation & the Thermo Test software for talking to them:

[download id=”5618″]

[download id=”5620″]

[download id=”5622″]

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Eberspacher D5W ECU Constant Overheat Error

Eberspacher ECU 25 1599 50 00 00
Eberspacher ECU 25 1599 50 00 00

Here’s another Eberspacher control unit, this time from an ancient D5W 5kW water heater. The system in this case is just flaky – sometimes the heater will start without fault & run perfectly, then suddenly will stop working entirely.
The error codes are read on these very old units via an indicator lamp connected to a test terminal. In this case the code was the one for Overheat Shutdown.

Considering this fault occurs when the heater is stone cold, I figured it was either a fault with the sensor itself or the ECU.

Temperature Sensor
Temperature Sensor

The temperature sensor is located on the heat exchanger, right next to the hot water outlet fitting. I’m not sure what the spec is, but it reads exactly 1KΩ at room temperature.

ECU PCB
ECU PCB

The PCB is held into the aluminium can by means of crimps around the edge that lock into the plastic terminal cover. Inserting a screwdriver & expanding the crimps allows the PCB to be slid out.

Casing Crimps
Casing Crimps

The factory date stamp on the microcontroller dates this unit to March 1989 – considerably older than I expected!
Unlike the newer versions that use transistors, this ECU has a bunch of PCB relays to do the high current switching of the water pump motor, fan motor & glowplug.
Overall the board looks to be solidly constructed, with silicone around all the larger components.

ECU PCB Solder Side
ECU PCB Solder Side

Here’s the solder side of the PCB, which has a generous coating of sealant to keep moisture out.

Bad Joint Closeup
Bad Joint Closeup

Looking at the solder joints for the row of relays on the top side of the PCB, it looks like that there’s some dry joints here.
I suspect that years of vibration has taken it’s toll, as the relays are otherwise unsupported. It wouldn’t be possible to use silicone to secure these devices as they are completely open – any sealant would likely stop them from operating.

Resoldered Joints
Resoldered Joints

Using a very hot soldering iron I managed to get the joints to reflow properly, using lots of flux to make sure the conformal coating didn’t interfere with the reflow.