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Siemens Orthphos 3 X-Ray Head Teardown

X-Ray Filter Carousel

X-Ray Filter Carousel

On the front of the head is the filter carousel. In this case it’s only fitted with a 2.5mm Aluminium filter. These are used to filter out the low-energy X-Rays from the beam, reducing the overall dose to the patient of radiation that does not contribute to the resulting image, as these lower energy rays are totally absorbed.

Top Cover Removed

Top Cover Removed

Removing a lot of cap screws later & the O-Ring sealed cover comes off the head. Unsurprisingly, this is full of dielectric mineral oil for insulation & cooling. There’s not much to see yet, as most of the components are hidden inside the plastic housings. The expansion bellows is at the top left, and the main HV transformer bottom left.

Wiring Feedthrough

Wiring Feedthrough

All the wiring to the head is fed through this plastic plug in the side, which is O-Ring sealed into the casting to prevent oil leaking out.

Tube Assembly

Tube Assembly

A clean bottle, syringe & some oily mess later, I manage to get the core out of the housing. This unit had about 3L of oil! The main HV transformer is hanging off the lower left corner of the plastic frame here, with the rest of the PSU behind it. The X-Ray tube is hiding within a metal shield in the tube to the right. There are no primary drive components present in the head – all of that is in the rest of the X-Ray machine.

X-Ray Tube Sleeve

X-Ray Tube Sleeve

A look down filament end of the X-Ray tube. There’s a shield around this, likely to help stop stray X-Rays, and to provide some electric field strength distribution, as this is connected to centre of the HV PSU’s voltage multiplier, biasing it at around +40kV.

Voltage Multiplier

Voltage Multiplier

Behind the transformer lies the rest of the PSU – a 4-stage voltage multiplier. There are 4 separate secondary windings on the transformer, each feeding a voltage doubler. This is to keep the high-voltage stress on the transformer windings to a minimum, as the windings themselves only see 10kV per section, instead of the full output voltage of 80kV. This is increased to 20kV per section by the full-wave doubler, and as these are all in series the output end has the full 80kV.

Ballast Resistor PCB

Ballast Resistor PCB

Over at the anode end of the X-Ray tube, is this board with 6x 6.8kΩ resistors in a series string for 40.8kΩ total. As this is in series with the tube anode, I presume it’s there for current limiting. At full power of 80kV 10mA, this stack will be dropping almost 500v & 4W of power.

X-Ray Aperture

X-Ray Aperture

At the bottom of the unit is the aperture where the X-Rays emerge. The connection to the centre of the voltage multiplier is also visible here.

Filament Powered

Filament Powered

Here is the view through the side of the tube with the filament powered at 4v. Filament current is about 2.6A. The copper heatsink block surrounding the Tungsten target is visible in the centre of the picture. The target is probably alloyed with Rhenium to give better longevity.

X-Ray Tube

X-Ray Tube

The tube is held into the frame by a single bolt in the middle of the anode spider. Removing this bolt allows the tube to come out, and it’s heavy. This is not that surprising, since the anode of the tube is a solid chunk of Tungsten & copper!

Orthophos 3 Head Schematic

Orthophos 3 Head Schematic

Finally, here is the internal schematic of the head itself, with the pinout marked. The operating frequency of the transformer is 35kHz, and it is my understanding that these are operated in resonant mode. There’s no filament transformer, the drive for this is supplied externally. Output voltage feedback is via an auxiliary winding on the transformer.

Contec ECG80A Electrocardiograph Teardown

Contec ECG80A

Contec ECG80A

I figured it was about time I added to the medical kit, and since Contec, who makes my SPO² meter seems to have a decent level of manufacturing quality, one of their ECG machines seemed like a good choice. This is the ECG80A handheld Electrocardiograph. This is a single channel, 12 lead unit – meaning it’s a full 12 lead ECG, but it records one lead at a time, in sequence.

Control Buttons

Control Buttons

Control is via the front panel, with some large buttons.

LCD Display

LCD Display

Readout is provided on a dot-matrix LCD, which is brightly backlit. There’s a thermal printer for rhythm strips, printing onto 50mm wide paper rolls.

Labelling

Labelling

The rear has the laser-marked rating plate, with all the specifications & regulatory markings. From the serial numbering, it looks like my unit was manufactured on 3/11/19, and was the 8th unit off the production line. Underneath can be seen the top of the battery pack, which just clips into place. There aren’t any markings on this at all, but I do know from the manual it’s a 7.4v 2S Li-Ion pack, energy capacity is another unknown, but there is very little weight to the battery, so it can’t be that large.

Internals

Internals

3 Philips screws hold the unit together, and once those are removed, the shell halves separate. The FFC to the LCD & button pad is currently keeping things connected together.

Acquisition PCB

Acquisition PCB

The first of 3 PCBs inside the shell is the acquisition PCB, with all the patient-connected circuitry. The DB-15 connector is on the right hand side, where the ECG leadset connects.

Signal Switching

Signal Switching

The bottom edge of the PCB has a trio of HJ4051 high speed analog multiplexers, which are switching the ECG leads onto the Ultra-Low Power Op-Amps on the right, a trio of TCL2254A devices from Texas Instruments, before being sent on to the ADC.

Acquisition PCB Bottom

Acquisition PCB Bottom

The bottom of the PCB has the DB-25 connector, along with the input protection diodes & resistors. This array of protection components serves two purposes – protection of the instrument against defibrillator voltages & protection of the patient from electrical shock by the instrument.

Signal Isolation

Signal Isolation

A 5kV isolation barrier is provided between the rest of the unit & the acquisition board, both for the data path & power path. The isolation transformer is visible on the left here, next to the 8-pin header that connects to the main PCB. There’s a 100MΩ resistor across the isolation barrier, probably for ESD bonding. To the right of that is a SiLabs Si8622ED single channel digital isolator IC.

ADC

ADC

The final bit of conversion of the input waveform is performed by a Texas Instruments ADS1291, a 2-channel 24-bit Analogue front-end specifically designed for Bioelectrical measurement such as ECG. This contains a ΔΣ ADC, and a pair of Programmable Gain Amplifiers on the input, together with some multiplexing. This communicates via SPI to the host microcontroller.

Isolated Power Supply

Isolated Power Supply

Power is transferred across the isolation gap through the transformer, driven by a Linear Tech LT3439 slew-rate controlled ultra low noise isolated switching supply driver.

Mainboard

Mainboard

Underneath the acquisition board is the main PCB itself, with the rest of the support electronics. On the lower edge of the board are the power supplies, the main microcontroller on the left, another STM32F103, USB Serial communications top right, and DC input bottom right.

Main CPU

Main CPU

Here’s the main microcontroller with it’s support components. This will be receiving a datastream from the acquisition microcontroller, probably I²C considering the single-channel digital isolation, and further decoding this for either display on the LCD, printing on the thermal paper or sending as a datastream over USB Serial to a PC.

Power Supplies

Power Supplies

The onboard 2S 7.4v Lithium Ion battery is handled by a Texas Instruments bq24103A Synchronous switched-mode charge management IC here, just to the left of the barrel jack. It’s inductor is just to the left of the IC. This is a fairly nice chip, with support for up to 3 series cells with full auto sensing.

DC-DC Converters

DC-DC Converters

Other power supply rails are dealt with via a pair of TPS5430 buck converters, again from TI. Their associated inductors are along the left side of the board. There’s also an LM1117-3.3 linear regulator for a low-noise supply, possibly for the microcontroller power rail. There’s also a few discrete switching components, and a DRV8834 bipolar stepper driver for the printer.

USB Interface

USB Interface

Finally, in the corner of the board is the USB connector, with a SiLabs CP2102 USB UART IC. This interface is used with the optional PC Software. The routed hole in the PCB is clearancing for the isolation transformer of the acquisition board.

Printer Module

Printer Module

Here’s the printer module, at the top of the shell. There’s a tiny stepper motor on the lower left that moves the paper past the print head, which is the bar mounted on springs across the centre. The odd thing with this is to load the paper, the black rubber pinch roller has to be completely removed from the printer, the paper placed across the print head, and the roller clipped back into place – instead of the roller being mounted on the front cover like on most thermal printers.

Printer Label

Printer Label

The printer module is manufactured by Sun-Tech, the STP376. I’ve not managed to find any information on this at all, either the manufacturer, or the part number. I did find a SunTech, in the medical sector, but their logo is very different from the labelling here.

Lead II Example Printout

Lead II Example Printout

Here’s an example of the print quality of the unit, which just so happens to be lead II taken from me! It’s pretty good overall, with nice clear printing. There is a little interference on the trace that can be seen, but that’s not the ECG’s fault – this trace was obtained in a relatively EMC-noisy environment. The unit first prints a section for patient details, then the lead ident & 1mV calibration mark, then the actual trace. Machine settings are printed in the top & bottom margins, showing the print speed, sensitivity setting, and any applied frequency settings. There is a little bit of interference on the  A full 12-lead printout is roughly 3 seconds per lead in sequence, and takes up about 1.2m of paper at standard 25mm/s speed setting.

Contec CMS-50F Pulse Oximeter Teardown

Rear Case

Rear Case

The rear has the specifications, laser-marked into the plastic. The serial numbers are just sticky labels though, and will come off easily with use.

Contec CMS-50F

Contec CMS-50F

This is the Contec CMS-50F wrist-mounted pulse oximeter unit, which has the capability to record data continuously to onboard memory, to be read out at a later time via a USB-Serial link. There is software supplied with the unit for this purpose, although it suffers from the usual Chinese quality problems. The hardware of this unit is rather well made, the firmware has some niggles but is otherwise fully functional, however the PC software looks completely rushed, is of low quality & just has enough functionality to kind-of pass as usable.

Top Cover Removed

Top Cover Removed

A total of 4 screws hold the casing together, once these are removed the top comes off. The large colour OLED display covers nearly all of the board here. The single button below is the user interface. The connection to the probe is made via the Lemo-style connector on the lower right.

Lithium Cell

Lithium Cell

Power is provided by a relatively large lithium-ion cell, rated at 1.78Wh.

Main Processor

Main Processor

All the heavy lifting work of the LCD, serial comms, etc are handled by this large Texas Instruments microcontroller, a MSP430F247. The clock crystal is just to the left, with the programming pins. I’m not sure of the purpose of the small IC in the top left corner, I couldn’t find any reference to the markings.

Aux Processor

Aux Processor

The actual pulse oximetry sensor readings seem to be dealth with by a secondary microcontroller, a Texas Instruments M430F1232 Mixed-Signal micro. This has it’s own clock crystal just underneath. The connections to the probe socket are to the right of this µC, while the programming bus is broken out to vias just above. The final devices on this side of the board are 3 linear regulators, supplying the rails to run all the logic in this device.

Main PCB Rear

Main PCB Rear

The rear of the PCB has the SiLabs CL2102 USB-Serial interface IC, the large Winbond 25X40CLNIG 512KByte SPI flash for recording oximetry data, and some of the power support components. The RTC crystal is also located here at the top of the board. Up in the top left corner is a Texas Instruments TPS61041 Boost converter, with it’s associated components. This is probably supplying the main voltage for the OLED display module.