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Contec CMS-50F Pulse Oximeter Teardown

Rear Case
Rear Case

The rear has the specifications, laser-marked into the plastic. The serial numbers are just sticky labels though, and will come off easily with use.

Contec CMS-50F
Contec CMS-50F

This is the Contec CMS-50F wrist-mounted pulse oximeter unit, which has the capability to record data continuously to onboard memory, to be read out at a later time via a USB-Serial link. There is software supplied with the unit for this purpose, although it suffers from the usual Chinese quality problems. The hardware of this unit is rather well made, the firmware has some niggles but is otherwise fully functional, however the PC software looks completely rushed, is of low quality & just has enough functionality to kind-of pass as usable.

Top Cover Removed
Top Cover Removed

A total of 4 screws hold the casing together, once these are removed the top comes off. The large colour OLED display covers nearly all of the board here. The single button below is the user interface. The connection to the probe is made via the Lemo-style connector on the lower right.

Lithium Cell
Lithium Cell

Power is provided by a relatively large lithium-ion cell, rated at 1.78Wh.

Main Processor
Main Processor

All the heavy lifting work of the LCD, serial comms, etc are handled by this large Texas Instruments microcontroller, a MSP430F247. The clock crystal is just to the left, with the programming pins. I’m not sure of the purpose of the small IC in the top left corner, I couldn’t find any reference to the markings.

Aux Processor
Aux Processor

The actual pulse oximetry sensor readings seem to be dealth with by a secondary microcontroller, a Texas Instruments M430F1232 Mixed-Signal micro. This has it’s own clock crystal just underneath. The connections to the probe socket are to the right of this ยตC, while the programming bus is broken out to vias just above. The final devices on this side of the board are 3 linear regulators, supplying the rails to run all the logic in this device.

Main PCB Rear
Main PCB Rear

The rear of the PCB has the SiLabs CL2102 USB-Serial interface IC, the large Winbond 25X40CLNIG 512KByte SPI flash for recording oximetry data, and some of the power support components. The RTC crystal is also located here at the top of the board. Up in the top left corner is a Texas Instruments TPS61041 Boost converter, with it’s associated components. This is probably supplying the main voltage for the OLED display module.

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Rigol DS1054Z 12v Conversion Project Update

While searching around for regulators to convert my new scope to 12v power, I remembered I had some DC-DC modules from Texas Instruments that I’d got a while ago. Luckily a couple of these are inverting controllers, that will go down to -15v DC at 15W/3A capacity.

I’ve had to order a new module from TI to do the -17v rail, but in the meantime I’ve been getting the other regulators set up & ready to go.

The DC-DC module I’ve got for the -7.5v rail is the PTN78060A type, and the +7.5v & +5v rails will be provided by the PTN78020W 6A buck regulators.

These regulators are rated well above what the scope actually draws, so I shouldn’t have any issues with power.

DC-DC Modules
DC-DC Modules

Here’s the regulators for the 5v, 7.5v & -7.5v rails, with multiturn potentiometers attached for setting the voltage output accurately. I’ve also attached a couple of electrolytics on the output for some more filtering. I’ll add on some more LC filters on the output to keep the noise down to an absolute minimum. These are set up ready with the exact same output voltage as the existing mains AC switching supply, when the final regulator arrives from TI I will put everything together & get some proper rail readings.

There won’t be a proper PCB for this, as I don’t have the parts in Eagle CAD, and I simply don’t have the energy to draw them out from the datasheets.

More to come when parts arrive!

73s for now ๐Ÿ™‚