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Rigol DS1054Z 12v Conversion Project Update

While searching around for regulators to convert my new scope to 12v power, I remembered I had some DC-DC modules from Texas Instruments that I’d got a while ago. Luckily a couple of these are inverting controllers, that will go down to -15v DC at 15W/3A capacity.

I’ve had to order a new module from TI to do the -17v rail, but in the meantime I’ve been getting the other regulators set up & ready to go.

The DC-DC module I’ve got for the -7.5v rail is the PTN78060A type, and the +7.5v & +5v rails will be provided by the PTN78020W 6A buck regulators.

These regulators are rated well above what the scope actually draws, so I shouldn’t have any issues with power.

DC-DC Modules
DC-DC Modules

Here’s the regulators for the 5v, 7.5v & -7.5v rails, with multiturn potentiometers attached for setting the voltage output accurately. I’ve also attached a couple of electrolytics on the output for some more filtering. I’ll add on some more LC filters on the output to keep the noise down to an absolute minimum. These are set up ready with the exact same output voltage as the existing mains AC switching supply, when the final regulator arrives from TI I will put everything together & get some proper rail readings.

There won’t be a proper PCB for this, as I don’t have the parts in Eagle CAD, and I simply don’t have the energy to draw them out from the datasheets.

More to come when parts arrive!

73s for now 🙂

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Arduino Based SWR/PWR Meter – The Board

I recently posted about a small analog SWR/Power meter I got from eBay, and figured it needed some improvement.

After some web searching I located a project by ON7EQ, an Arduino sketch to read SWR & RF power from any SWR bridge.
The Arduino code is on the original author’s page above, his copyright restrictions forbid me to reproduce it here.

I have also noticed a small glitch in the code when it is flashed to a blank arduino: The display will show scrambled characters as if it has crashed. However pushing the buttons a few times & rebooting the Arduino seems to fix this. I think it’s related to the EEPROM being blank on a new Arduino board.

I have run a board up in Eagle for testing, shown below is the layout:

SWR Meter SCH
SWR Meter SCH

The Schematic is the same as is given on ON7EQ’s site.
Update: ON7EQ has kindly let me know I’ve mixed up R6 & R7, so make sure they’re switched round when the board is built ;). Fitting the resistors the wrong way around may damage the µC with overvoltage.

SWR Meter PCB
SWR Meter PCB

Here’s the PCB layout. I’ve kept it as simple as possible with only a single link on the top side of the board.

PCB Top
PCB Top

Here’s the freshly completed PCB ready to rock. Arduino Pro mini sits in the center doing all the work.
The link over to A5 on the arduino can be seen here, this allows the code to detect the supply voltage, useful for battery operation.
On the right hand edge of the PCB are the pair of SMA connectors to interface with the SWR bridge. Some RF filtering is provided on the inputs.

PCB Bottom
PCB Bottom

Trackside view of the PCB. This was etched using my tweaked toner transfer method.

LCD Fitted
LCD Fitted

Here the board has it’s 16×2 LCD module.

Online
Online

Board powered & working. Here it’s set to the 70cm band. The pair of buttons on the bottom edge of the board change bands & operating modes.
As usual, the Eagle layout files are available below, along with the libraries I use.

[download id=”5585″]

[download id=”5573″]

More to come on this when some components arrive to interface this board with the SWR bridge in the eBay meter.

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Precision 10v & 5v Reference

After watching a video over at Scullcom Hobby Electronics on YouTube, I figured I’d build one of these precision references to calibrate my multimeters.

It’s based around a REF102P 10v precision reference & an INA105P precision unity gain differential amplifier.

For full information, check out the video, I won’t go into the details here, just my particular circuit & PCB layout.

In the video, Veroboard is used. I’m not too fond of the stuff personally. I find it far too easy to make mistakes & it never quite looks good enough. To this end I have spun a board in Eagle, as usual.

Precision Ref SCH
Precision Ref SCH – Click to Embiggen

Here’s the schematic layout, the same as is in the video.

Precision Ref BRD
Precision Ref BRD

As usual, the Eagle CAD layout files can be found at the bottom of the post.

And the associated PCB layout. I have added the option to be able to tweak the output, to get a more accurate calibration, which can be added by connecting JP1 on the PCB.

As in the original build, this unit uses pre-built DC-DC converter & Li-Ion charger modules. A handy Eagle library can be found online for these parts.
I have however left off the battery monitor section of the circuit, since I plan to use a protected lithium cell for power. This also allowed me to keep the board size down, & use a single sided layout.

Toner Transfer Paper
Toner Transfer Paper

Here’s the track layout ready to iron onto the copper clad board. I use the popular toner transfer system with special paper from eBay, this stuff has a coating that allows the toner to easily be transferred to the PCB without having to mess about with soaking in water & scraping paper off.

Ironed On
Ironed On

Here’s the paper having just been ironed onto the copper. After waiting for the board to cool off the paper is peeled off, leaving just the toner on the PCB.

Etched PCB
Etched PCB

PCB just out of the etch tank, drilled & with the solder pins for the modules installed. Only one issue with the transfer, in the bottom left corner of the board is visible, a very small section of copper was over etched.
This is easily fixed with a small piece of wire.

Components Populated
Components Populated

Main components populated. The DC-DC converter is set at 24v output, which the linear regulator then drops down to the +15v rail for the reference IC. The linear section of the regulator, along with the LC filter on the output of the switching regulator produce a low-ripple supply.

SMPS Ripple
SMPS Ripple

Here’s the scope reading the AC ripple on the output of the DC-DC converter. Scale is 100mV/Div. Roughly 150mV of ripple is riding on top of the DC rail.

Linear PSU Ripple
Linear PSU Ripple

And here’s the output from the linear regulator, scale of 50mV/Div. Ripple has been reduced to ~15mV for the reference IC.
In total the circuit as built has a power consumption of ~0.5W, most of which is being dissipated as heat in the linear part of the PSU.

[download id=”5583″]