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Virtualmin Mail – Enabling Sieve Support

For years now I’ve used Virtualmin for my hosting requirements, and have made use of Procmail to filter my mail into folders (it’s the default, and rather tightly integrated). The only issue with this system is having to login to two different things for mail: I use Rainloop Webmail for general mail viewing, but the Procmail filters are only editable through the Usermin section of Virtualmin. This is awkward to say the least, so being able to use Sieve which is already supported by Rainloop is a better option. (Sieve is also supported via plugin in Roundcube).

Since we’re going to still need Procmail for the Virtualmin-managed Spam & Virus scanning functions, we will add Sieve at the end of Procmail. There are some

First thing, get Sieve installed via Dovecot, with the following:

yum install dovecot-pigeonhole

Some configuration changes are required to Dovecot to get the Sieve server running, /etc/dovecot/conf.d/15-lda.conf should have this section:

Finally, in /etc/dovecot/conf.d/20-managesieve.conf, uncomment this section to enable the managesieve server:

After these changes are made, restart Dovecot to get the configs reloaded. It’s easy to check if the Sieve server is listening by running the following command:

Now for some minor changes to /etc/procmailrc to direct mail to Dovecot for delivery:

I personally got an error when I made all these changes, which in my case was a permissions issue on the Dovecot log:

This was solved by opening the permissions for /var/log/dovecot, this then vanished, and the logs confirmed Sieve was working properly.

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Anker PowerPort Speed 5 12v DC Conversion

A few months ago I did a teardown on this Anker PowerPort Speed 5 USB charger, but I didn’t get round to detailing the conversion to 12v I had to do, so I’ll get to that now I’ve got a couple more to convert over.

Power Module
Power Module

Here’s the internals of the Anker charger once I’ve removed the casing – which like many things these days, is glued together. (Joints can be cracked with a screwdriver handle without damaging the case). There’s lots of heatsinking in here to cool the primary side switching devices & the pot core transformers, so this is the first thing to get removed.

Heatsink Removed
Heatsink Removed

Once the heatsink has been removed, the pot core transformers are visible, wrapped in yellow tape. There’s some more heatsink pads & thermal grease here, to conduct heat better. The transformers, primary side switching components & input filter capacitor have to go.

Primary Side Components Removed
Primary Side Components Removed

Here’s the PCB once all the now redundant mains conversion components have been deleted. I’ve left the input filtering & bridge rectifier in place, as this solves the issue of the figure-8 cable on the input being reversible, polarity of the input doesn’t matter with the bridge. I’ve removed the main filter capacitor to make enough room for the DC-DC converters to be fitted.

Tails Installed
Tails Installed

Installing the tails to connect everything together is the next step, this charger requires two power supplies – the QC3 circuits need 14.4v to supply the multi-voltage modules, the remaining 3 standard ports require 5v. The DC input tails are soldered into place where the main filter capacitor was, while the outputs are fitted to the spot the transformer secondary windings ended up. I’ve left the factory Schottky rectifiers in place on the secondary side to make things a little more simple, the output voltages of both the DC-DC converters does need to be increased slightly to compensate for the diode drops though. I’ve also bypassed the mains input fuse, as at 12v the input current is going to be substantially higher than when used on mains voltage.

DC-DC Converters Installed
DC-DC Converters Installed

With a squeeze both the boost converter & the buck converter fit into place on the PCB.

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Sony PS3 APS-231 Power Supply Voltage Mod

PSU Ratings
PSU Ratings
PSU Ratings

I was recently given a Sony PS3 with a dead disc drive, and since I’m not a console gamer I figured I’d see if there were any handy parts inside. Turns out these units contain a rather nice SMPS, the Sony APS-231 with a high power 12v rail, rated at 23.5A. A bit of searching around discovered a thread on the BadCaps Forums about voltage modding these supplies for a 13.8v output, suitable for my Ham radio gear.
These supplies are controlled by a Sony CXA8038A, for which there is very little information. Active PFC is included, along with synchronous rectification which increases the efficiency of the supply, and in turn, reduces the waste heat output from the rectifiers.

Regulation Section
Regulation Section

Like many of the SMPS units I’ve seen, the output voltage is controlled by referencing it to an adjustable shunt reference, and adjusting the set point of this reference will in turn adjust the output voltage of the supply, this is done in circuit by a single resistor.

Here’s the regulator section of the PSU, with the resistors labelled. The one we’re after changing is the 800Ω one between pins 2 & 3 of the TS2431 shunt reference. It’s a very small 0402 size resistor, located right next to the filter electrolytic for the 5v standby supply circuit. A fine tip on the soldering iron is required to get this resistor removed.

Attachment Points
Attachment Points

Once this resistor is removed from the circuit, a 1KΩ 18-turn potentiometer is fitted in it’s place, from the Anode (Pin 3) to the Ref. (Pin 2) pins of the TS2431 shunt reference. I initally set the potentiometer to be the same 800Ω as the factory set resistor, to make sure the supply would start up at a sensible voltage before I did the adjustment.

Potentiometer
Potentiometer

The pot is secured to the top of the standby supply transformer with a drop of CA glue to stop everything moving around. The supply can now be adjusted to a higher setpoint voltage – 13.8v is about the maxumum, as the OVP cuts the supply out at between 13.9v-14v.

Modded Voltage
Modded Voltage

After doing some testing at roughly 50% of the supply’s rated load, everything seems to be stable, and nothing is heating up more than I’d expect.

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Anker PowerPort Speed 5 USB Rapid Charger Teardown

Front
Front

Here’s a piece of tech that is growing all the more important in recent times, with devices with huge battery capacities, a quick charger. This unit supports Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3 standard, where the device being charged can negotiate with the charger for a higher-power link, by increasing the bus voltage past the usual 5v.

Rear
Rear

The casing feels rather nice on this unit, sturdy & well designed. All the legends on the case are laser marked, apart from the front side logo which is part of the injection moulding.

Specifications
Specifications

The power capacity of this charger is pretty impressive, with outputs for QC3 from 3.6-6.5v at 3A, up to 12v 1.5A. Standard USB charging is limited at 4.8A for the other 3 ports.

Ports
Ports

The two of the 5 USB ports are colour coded blue on the QC3 ports. The other 3 are standard 5v ports, the only thing that doesn’t make sense in the ratings is the overall current rating of the 5v supply (4.8A), and the rated current of each of the ports (2.4A) – this is 7.2A total rather than 4.8A.

Top Removed
Top Removed

The casing is glued together at the seam, but it gave in to some percussive attack with a screwdriver handle. The inside of this supply is mostly hidden by the large heatspreader on the top.

Main PCB Bottom
Main PCB Bottom

This is a nicely designed board, the creepage distances are at least 8mm between the primary & secondary sides, the bottom also has a conformal coating, with extra silicone around the primary-side switching transistor pins, presumably to decrease the chances of the board flashing over between the close pins.
On the lower 3 USB ports can be seen the 3 SOT-23 USB charge control ICs. These are probably similar to the Texas Instruments TPS2514 controllers, which I’ve experimented with before, however I can’t read the numbers due to the conformal coating. The other semiconductors on this side of the board are part of the voltage feedback circuits for the SMPS. The 5v supply optocoupler is in the centre bottom of the board.

Heatsink Removed
Heatsink Removed

Desoldering the pair of primary side transistors allowed me to easily remove the heatspreader from the supply. There’s thermal pads & grease over everything to get rid of the heat. Here can be seen there are two transformers, forming completely separate supplies for the standard USB side of things & the QC3 side. Measuring the voltages on the main filter capacitors showed me the difference – the QC3 supply is held at 14.2v, and is managed through other circuits further on in the power chain. There’s plenty of mains filtering on the input, as well as common-mode chokes on the DC outputs before they reach the USB ports.

Quick Charge 3 DC-DC Converters
Quick Charge 3 DC-DC Converters

Here’s where the QC3 magic happens, a small DC-DC buck converter for each of the two ports. The data lines are also connected to these modules, so all the control logic is located on these too. The TO-220 device to the left is the main rectifier.

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Dyson DC16 Handheld Teardown

DC16
DC16

The Dyson DC16 is one of the older handheld vacuums, before the introduction of the “Digital Motor”. (Marketing obviously didn’t think “Switched Reluctance Motor” sounded quite as good).

These vacuums have a very large DC brush motor driving the suction turbine instead, the same as would be found in a cordless power tool.

Control PCB
Control PCB

Popping the front cap off with the ID label, reveals the brains of the vacuum. The two large terminals at the right are for charging, which is only done at 550mA (0.5C). There are two PIC microcontrollers in here, along with a large choke, DC-DC converter for supplying the logic most likely. The larger of the MCUs, a PIC16HV785, is probably doing the soft-start PWM on the main motor, the smaller of the two, a PIC16F684 I’m sure is doing battery charging & power management. The motor has a PCB on it’s tail end, with a very large MOSFET, a pair of heavy leads connect directly from the battery connector to the motor.
Just out of sight on the bottom left edge of the board is a Hall Effect Sensor, this detects the presence of the filter by means of a small magnet, the vacuum will not start without a filter fitted.

Battery Pack
Battery Pack

The battery pack is a large custom job, obviously. 4 terminals mean there’s slightly more in here than just the cells.

Battery Cracked
Battery Cracked

Luckily, instead of ultrasonic or solvent welding the case, these Dyson batteries are just snapped together. Some mild attack with a pair of screwdrivers allows the end cap to be removed with minimal damage.

Cells
Cells

The cells were lightly hot-glued into the shell, but that can easily be solved with a drop of Isopropanol to dissolve the glue bond. The pack itself is made up of 6 Sony US18650VT High-Drain 18650 Li-Ion cells in series for 21.6v nominal. These are rated at a max of 20A discharge current, 10A charge current, and 1.3Ah capacity nominal.
There’s no intelligence in this battery pack, the extra pair of terminals are for a thermistor, so the PIC in the main body knows what temperature the pack is at – it certainly gets warm while in use due to the high current draw.

Motor
Motor

Hidden in the back side of the main body is the motor. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to get this out without doing some damage, as the wiring isn’t long enough to free the unit without some surgery.

Turbine
Turbine

The suction is generated by a smaller version of the centrifugal high-speed blowers used in full size vacuums. Not much to see here.

Unofficial Charger
Unofficial Charger

Since I got this without a charger, I had to improvise. The factory power supply is just a 28v power brick, all the charging logic is in the vacuum itself, so I didn’t have to worry about such nasties as over-charging. I have since fitted the battery pack with a standard Li-Po balance cable, so it can be used with my ProCell charger, which will charge the pack in 35 minutes, instead of the 3 hours of the original charger.

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Chinese CO Meter – The Sensor Cell

As the CO meter I bought on eBay didn’t register anything whatsoever, I decided I’d hack the sensor itself apart to make sure it wasn’t just an empty steel can. It turns out that it’s not just an empty can, but there are some reasons why the thing doesn’t work 😉

Cell Disassembled
Cell Disassembled

The cell was crimped together under the yellow shrinkwrap, but that’s nothing my aviation snips couldn’t take care of. The photo above shows the components from inside.

End Cap
End Cap

The endcap is just a steel pressing, nothing special here.

Filter
Filter

Also pretty standard is the inlet filter over the tiny hole in the next plate, even though it’s a lot more porous that I’ve seen before in other sensors.

Working Electrode Components
Working Electrode Components

Next up is the working electrode assembly, this also forms the seal on the can when it’s crimped, along with insulating it from the counter electrode & external can. The small disc third from left is supposed to be the electrode, which in these cells should be loaded with Platinum. Considering where else they’ve skimped in this unit, I’ll be very surprised if it’s anything except graphite.

Counter Electrode
Counter Electrode

Next up is the counter electrode, which is identical to the first, working electrode. Again I doubt there’s any precious metals in here.

Backplate
Backplate

Another steel backplate finishes off the cell itself, and keeps most of the liquid out, just making sure everything stays moist.

Rear Can & Reservoir
Rear Can & Reservoir

Finally, the rear of the cell holds the reservoir of liquid electrolyte. This is supposed to be Sulphuric Acid, but yet again they’ve skimped on the cost, and it’s just WATER.

It’s now not surprising that it wouldn’t give me any readings, this cell never would have worked correctly, if at all, without the correct electrolyte. These cheap alarms are dangerous, as people will trust it to alert them to high CO levels, when in fact it’s nothing more than a fancy flashing LED with an LCD display.

Ironically enough, when I connected a real electrochemical CO detector cell to the circuit from the alarm, it started working, detecting CO given off from a burning Butane lighter. It wouldn’t be calibrated, but it proves everything electronic is there & operational. It’s not surprising that the corner cut in this instance is on the sensor cell, as they contain precious metals & require careful manufacturing it’s where the cost lies with these alarms.

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Camping Gear – Optimus Nova Multifuel Stove

Stove
Stove

For as long as I can remember I’ve been using Trangia-type alcohol fuelled stoves when I go camping, even though these have served my needs well they’re very limited & tend to waste fuel. I did some looking around for Paraffin/Kerosene fuelled stoves instead, as I already have this fuel on site.
I found very good reviews on the Optimus Nova above, so I decided to go for this one.

This stove can run on many different fuel types, “white gas” (petrol without any vehicle additives) Diesel, Kerosene & Jet A.

Burner
Burner

Here’s the “hot end” of the device, the burner itself. This is made in two cast Brass sections, that are brazed together. The fuel jet can be just seen in the centre of the casting.

Fuel Pump
Fuel Pump

The fuel bottle is pressurised with a pump very similar to the ones used on Paraffin pressure lamps, so I’m used to this kind of setup. The fuel dip tube has a filter on the end to stop any munge gumming up the valves or the burner jet.

Pre-Heating
Pre-Heating

As with all liquid-fuelled vapour burners, it has to be preheated. There’s a fibreglass pad in the bottom of the burner for this, and can be soaked with any fuel of choice. The manual states to preheat with the fuel in the bottle, but as I’m using Paraffin, this would be very smoky indeed, so here it’s being preheated with a bit of Isopropanol.
The fuel bottle can be seen in the background as well, connected to the burner with a flexible hose. The main burner control valve is attached to the green handle bottom centre.

Simmer
Simmer

Once the preheating flame has burned down, the fuel valve can be opened, here’s the stove burning Paraffin on very low simmer. (An advantage over the older alcohol burners I’m used to – adjustable heat!)

Full Power!
Full Power!

Opening the control valve a couple of turns gives flamethrower mode. At full power, the burner is a little loud, but no louder than my usual Paraffin pressure lamps.

Flame Pattern
Flame Pattern

With a pan of water on the stove, the flame covers the entire base of the pan. Good for heat transfer. This stove was able to boil 1L of water from cold in 5 minutes. A little longer than the manual states, but that’s still much quicker than I’m used to!

Fuel Jet
Fuel Jet

The top of the burner opens for cleaning, here’s a look at the jet in the centre of the burner. The preheating pad can be seen below the brass casting.

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Chinese 12v 10A Power Brick Analysis

I recently ordered a PSU to run one of the TVs I converted to 12v operation, and being an older TV, it’s a fairly heavy load at 6.5A. eBay to the rescue again, with a cheap 10A rated supply.

Power Brick
Power Brick

Like all similar supplies these days, it’s a SMPS unit, and feels suspiciously light for it’s power rating.

Cover Removed
Cover Removed

Luckily this one is easy to get into, no ultrasonic welding on the case, just clips. Here’s the top cover removed, big alloy plate between the heatsinks.

PCB
PCB

The top heatsink plate was glued to the top of the transformer with silicone, some gentle prying released it. From the top, things don’t look too bad. There’s some filtering on the mains input & it’s even fused!

Primary Side
Primary Side

Here’s a closeup of the primary side of the PSU, the main DC bus capacitor is a Nichicon one, but it’s clearly been recovered from another device, look at the different glue on the end!
it’s also flapping about in the breeze, the squirt of silicone they’ve put on does nothing to stop movement.
Also here is the mains input fuse, filter capacitor & common mode choke. At least there is some filtering!

The main control IC is a UC3843B High Performance Current Mode PWM Controller, operating at a switching frequency of 250kHz.
The main switching transistor is visible at the bottom left corner, attached to the heatsink.

Secondary Side
Secondary Side

Here’s the secondary side of the supply. The transformer itself is OK, nice heavy windings on the output to suit the high current.
It’s using proper opto-isolated feedback for voltage regulation, with a TL431 reference IC.
The output diodes are attached to the heatsink at the top of the photo, I couldn’t read any numbers on those parts.

The output filter capacitors are low quality, only time will tell if they survive. I’ll put the supply under full load & see what the temperature rise is inside the casing.

PCB Bottom
PCB Bottom

On the bottom of the PCB things get a little more dire. There isn’t really much of an isolation gap between the primary & secondary sides, and there’s a track joining the output negative with mains earth, which gets to within 2mm of the live mains input!

As with all these cheapo supplies, there’s good points & bad points, I will update when I’ve had a chance to put the supply under full load for a while & see if it explodes!

 

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Labgear PSM114E/S 12v Conversion

Onboard the boat we have a small issue with a weak TV signal, and this coupled with a 60′ long run of coax is an issue. Due to the loss in the coax, we’ve lost most of the already weak signal.
To try & solve this issue, I’m fitting a masthead amplifier unit.

These amplifiers are fed power down the same coax that’s carrying the RF signal, and a special power supply is supplied with the amplifier for this. However it’s only 240v AC, no 12v version available.

Here’s the power supply unit, which fits into the coax between the TV & the antenna.

Amplifier Supply
Amplifier Supply

Luckily the 240v supply is easily removable & here has been replaced with a 12v regulator.

New Supply
New Supply

There’s not very much inside the shielding can, just a few filter capacitors & an RF choke on the DC feed, to keep the RF out of the power supply system.

The original cable is used, so the supply doesn’t even look like it’s been modified from the outside.

More to come on this when I get the amplifier installed along with the new coax run 🙂

73s

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Cisco PSU Hack & Switched Mode PSU Background

Recently I decommissioned some networking equipment, and discovered the power supplies in some switches were single rail 12v types, with a rather high power rating. I figured these would be very good for powering my Ham radio gear.

They’re high quality Delta Electronics DPSN-150BP units, rated at a maximum power output of 156W.

Label
Label

These supplies have an adjustment pot for the output voltage regulation, but unfortunately it just didn’t have quite enough range to get from 12.0v to 13.8v. The highest they would go was ~13.04v.

After taking a look at the regulator circuit, I discovered  I could further adjust the output voltage by changing a single resistor to a slightly lower value.

Firstly though, a little background on how switched mode power supplies operate & regulate their output voltage.

SMPS
SMPS

Here’s the supply. It’s mostly heatsink, to cool the large power switching transistors.

The first thing a SMPS does, is to rectify the incoming mains AC with a bridge rectifier. This is then smoothed by a large electrolytic capacitor, to provide a main DC rail of +340v DC (when on a 240v AC supply).

Mains Input
Mains Input

Above is the mains input section of the PSU, with a large common-mode choke on the left, bridge rectifier in the centre, and the large filter capacitor on the right. These can store a lot of energy when disconnected from the mains, and while they should have a discharge resistor fitted to safely drain the stored energy, they aren’t to be relied on for safety!

Once the supply has it’s main high voltage DC rail, this is switched into the main transformer by a pair of very large transistors – these are hidden from view on the large silver heatsinks at the bottom of the image. These transistors are themselves driven with a control IC, in the case of this supply, it’s a UC3844B. This IC is hidden under the large heatsink, but is just visible in the below photo. (IC5).

Control IC
Control IC
Main Switching Transformer
Main Switching Transformer

Here’s the main switching transformer, these can be much smaller than a conventional transformer due to the high frequencies used. This supply operates at 500kHz.
After the main transformer, the output is rectified by a pair of Schottky diodes, which are attached to the smaller heatsink visible below the transformer, before being fed through a large toroidal inductor & the output filter capacitors.
All this filtering on both the input & the output is required to stop these supplies from radiating their operating frequency as RF – a lot of cheap Chinese switching supplies forego this filtering & as a result are extremely noisy.

After all this filtering the DC appears at the output as usable power.

Getting back to regulation, these supplies read the voltage with a resistor divider & feed it back to the mains side control IC, through an opto-isolator. (Below).

Feedback Loop
Feedback Loop

The opto isolators are the black devices at the front with 4 pins.

Regulator Adjustment
Regulator Adjustment

For a more in-depth look at the inner workings of SMPS units, there’s a good article over on Hardware Secrets.

My modification is simple. Replacing R306 (just below the white potentiometer in the photo), with a slightly smaller resistor value, of 2.2KΩ down from 2.37KΩ, allows the voltage to be pulled lower on the regulator. This fools the unit into applying more drive to the main transformer, and the output voltage rises.

It’s important to note that making too drastic a change to these supplies is likely to result in the output filter capacitors turning into grenades due to overvoltage. The very small change in value only allows the voltage to rise to 13.95v max on the adjuster. This is well within the rating of 16v on the output caps.

Now the voltage has been sucessfully modified, a new case is on the way to shield fingers from the mains. With the addition of a couple of panel meters & output terminals, these supplies will make great additions to my shack.

More to come on the final build soon!

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BMW Passenger Airbag

Top
Top

This is a passenger side airbag from a BMW vehicle. Here is the top of the device, with all the warning labels & information.

Folded Bag
Folded Bag

Here the outer plastic wrap has been removed from the unit, showing the folded nylon fabric bag.

Frame
Frame

The base frame with the gas generator mounted.

Gas Generator
Gas Generator

Gas generator with warning label. This is a two part generator, with a pair of independent cores inside.

Generator Core
Generator Core

One of the generator cores removed from the heavy steel shell of the gas generator. The layers of wire mesh on the outside act as a flame trap, releasing only the gas generated from the burning propellant inside.

Propellant
Propellant

End cap removed from the core, showing the pellets of propellant & the many layers of mesh & fibreglass filter material. The explosive initiator is in the bottom of this unit. A spring under the end cap firmly holds the pellets against the initiator.

Initiator
Initiator

Finally, here is the explosive initiator that is located in the bottom of the core under the propellant pellets. This consists of a primary explosive & an electric match, which can be seen below as the device is disassembled.

Initiator Components
Initiator Components
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Zebra P330i Card Printer

Front
Front

This is the teardown of a Zebra P330i plastic card printer, used for creating ID cards, membership cards, employee cards, etc. I got this as a faulty unit, which I will detail later on.
This printer supports printing on plastic cards from 1-30mils thick, using dye sublimation & thermal transfer type printing methods. Interfaces supplied are USB & Ethernet. The unit also has the capability to be fitted with a mag stripe encoder & a smart card encoder, for extra cost.

Print Engine
Print Engine

 

 

 

 

On the left here is the print engine open, the blue cartridge on the right is a cleaning unit, using an adhesive roller to remove any dirt from the incoming card stock.
This is extremely important on a dye sublimation based printing engine as any dirt on the cards will cause printing problems.

Cards In Feeder
Cards In Feeder

 

Here on the right is the card feeder unit, stocked with cards. This can take up to 100 cards from the factory.
The blue lever on the left is used to set the card thickness being used, to prevent misfeeds. There is a rubber gate in the intake port of the printer which is moved by this lever to stop any more than a single card from being fed into the print engine at any one time.

Card Feeder Belt
Card Feeder Belt

 

 

 

Here is the empty card feeder, showing the rubber conveyor belt. This unit was in fact the problem with the printer, the drive belt from the DC motor under this unit was stripped, preventing the cards from feeding into the printer.

Print Head
Print Head

 

 

 

Here is a closeup of the print head assembly. The brown/black stripe along the edge is the row of thin-film heating elements. This is a 300DPI head.

 

Print Station
Print Station

 

 

 

This is under the print head, the black roller on the left is the platen roller, which supports the card during printing. The spool in the center of the picture is the supply spool for the dye ribbon.
In the front of the black bar in the bottom center, is a two-colour sensor, used to locate the ribbon at the start of the Yellow panel to begin printing.

LCD PCB
LCD PCB

 

 

Inside the top cover is the indicator LCD, the back of which is pictured right.
This is a 16×1 character LCD from Hantronix. This unit has a parallel interface.

LCD
LCD

 

 

 

 

Front of the LCD, this is white characters on a blue background.

Roller Drive Belts
Roller Drive Belts

 

 

 

Here is the cover removed from the printer, showing the drive belts powering the drive rollers. There is an identical arrangement on the other side of the print engine running the other rollers at the input side of the engine.

Mains Filter
Mains Filter

 

 

 

Here the back panel has been removed from the entire print engine, complete with the mains input wiring & RFI filtering.
This unit has excellent build quality, just what is to be expected from a £1,200+ piece of industrial equipment.

Main Frame With Motors
Main Frame With Motors

 

 

The bottom of the print engine, with all the main wiring & PCB removed, showing the main drive motors. The left hand geared motor operates the head lift, the centre motor is a stepper, which operates the main transmission for the cards. The right motor drives the ribbon take up spindle through an O-Ring belt.

Feeder Drive Motor
Feeder Drive Motor

 

 

 

Card feeder drive motor, this connects to the belt assembly through a timing belt identical to the roller drive system.
All these DC geared motors are 18v DC, of varying torque ratings.

Power Supply
Power Supply

 

 

 

Here is the main power supply, a universal input switch-mode unit, outputting 24v DC at 3.3A.

PSU Label
PSU Label

 

 
PSU info. This is obviously an off the shelf unit, manufactured by Hitek. Model number FUEA240.

Print Engine Rear
Print Engine Rear

 

 

 

The PSU has been removed from the back of the print engine, here is shown the remaining mechanical systems of the printer.

Print Engine Components
Print Engine Components

 

 
A further closeup of the print engine mechanical bay, the main stepper motor is bottom centre, driving the brass flywheel through another timing belt drive. The O-Ring drive on the right is for the ribbon take up reel, with the final motor driving the plastic cam on the left to raise/lower the print head assembly.
The brass disc at the top is connected through a friction clutch to the ribbon supply reel, which provides tension to keep it taut. The slots in the disc are to sense the speed of the ribbon during printing, which allows the printer to tell if there is no ribbon present or if it has broken.

RFID PCB
RFID PCB

Here is a further closeup, showing the RFID PCB behind the main transmission. This allows the printer to identify the ribbon fitted as a colour or monochrome.
The antenna is under the brass interrupter disc on the left.

I/O Daughterboard
I/O Daughterboard

 

 

 

 

 

The I/O daughterboard connects to the main CPU board & interfaces all the motors & sensors in the printer.

Main PCB
Main PCB

Here is the main CPU board, which contains all the logic & processing power in the printer.

CPU
CPU

 

 

 
Main CPU. This is a Freescale Semiconductor part, model number MCF5206FT33A, a ColdFire based 32-bit CPU. Also the system ROM & RAM can be seen on the right hand side of this picture.

Ethernet Interface
Ethernet Interface

 

Bottom of the Ethernet interface card, this clearly has it’s own RAM, ROM & FPGA. This is due to this component being a full Parallel interface print server.

Ethernet Interface Top
Ethernet Interface Top

 

 

 

 
Top of the PCB, showing the main processor of the print server. This has a ferrite sheet glued to the top, for interference protection.

 

 

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532nm DPSS Module

DPSS Module
DPSS Module

A quick post documenting a DPSS laser module i salvaged from a disco scanner. Estimated output ~80mW

Diode Connection
Diode Connection

Connection to the 808nm pump diode on the back of the module. There is a protection diode soldered across the diode pins. (Not visible). Note heatsinking of the module.

Driver PCB
Driver PCB

Driver PCB. This module was originally 240v AC powered, with a transformer mounted on the PCB with a built in rectifier & filter capacitor. I converted it to 5v operation. Emission LED on PCB.

Output
Output

Output beam from the module.

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Fluval 203 Canister Filter

Assembly
Assembly

Here is an old fish tank external filter & a few pics of the insides.

Label
Label

Label on the front of the pump head. Fittings on either side of the motor are water I/O.

Pump
Pump

Underside of the pump head, inlet is on the right, outlet from the pump is on the left. Pump intake in centre.

Pump Parts
Pump Parts

Pump disassembled. This pump requires no shaft seals as the impeller is driven magnetically with a synchronous motor.

Filter Stack
Filter Stack

Filter stack removed from the unit. From left: foam media, activated charcoal/gravel & ceramic pellets.

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Chicom “500W” ATX PSU

Cover Removed
Cover Removed

Here is a cheapo 500W rated ATX PSU that has totally borked itself, probably due to the unit NOT actually being capable of 500W. All 3 of the switching transistors were shorted, causing the ensuing carnage:

AC Input
AC Input

Here is the AC input to the PCB. Note the vapourised element inside the input fuse on the left. There is no PFC/filtering built into this supply, being as cheap as it is links have been installed in place of the RFI chokes.

Input Side
Input Side

Main filter capacitors & bridge rectifier diodes. PCB shows signs of excessive heating.

Filter Caps Removed
Filter Caps Removed

Filter capacitors have been removed from the PCB here, showing some cooked components. Resistor & diode next to the heatsink are the in the biasing network for the main switching transistors.

Heatsinks Removed
Heatsinks Removed

Heatsink has been removed, note the remaining pin from one of the switching transistors still attached to the PCB & not the transistor 🙂

Transformers
Transformers

Output side of the PSU, with heatsink removed. Main transformer on  the right, transformers centre & left are the 5vSB  transformer & feedback transformer.

Output Side
Output Side

Output side of the unit, filter capacitors, choke & rectifier diodes are visible here attached to their heatsink.

Comparator
Comparator

Comparator IC that deals with regulation of the outputs & overvoltage protection.

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Southwestern Bell Freedom Phone

Phone
Phone

This is an old cordless landline phone, with dead handset batteries.

Handset Radio Board
Handset Radio Board

Here’s the handset with the back removed. Shown is the radio TX/RX board, underneath is the keyboard PCB with the speaker & mic. All the FM radio tuning coils are visible & a LT450GW electromechanical filter.

Handset Radio Board Bottom
Handset Radio Board Bottom

Radio PCB removed from the housing showing the main CPU controlling the unit, a Motorola MC13109FB.

Keypad Board
Keypad Board

The keypad PCB, with also holds the microphone & speaker.

Handset Keypad Board Bottom
Handset Keypad Board Bottom

Bottom of the keypad board, which holds a LSC526534DW 8-Bit µC & a AT93C46R serial EEPROM for phone number storage.

Base Main Board
Base Main Board

Here’s the base unit with it’s top cover removed. Black square object on far right of image is the microphone for intercom use, power supply section is top left, phone interface bottom left, FM radio is centre. Battery snap for power backup is bottom right.

Power Supply Section
Power Supply Section

PSU section of the board on the left here, 9v AC input socket at the bottom, with bridge rectifier diodes & main filter capacitor above. Two green transformers on the right are for audio impedance matching. Another LT450GW filter is visible at the top, part of the base unit FM transceiver.

ICs
ICs

Another 8-bit µC, this time a LSC526535P, paired with another AT93C46 EEPROM. Blue blob is 3.58MHz crystal resonator for the MCU clock. The SEC IC is a KS58015 4-bit binary to DTMF dialer IC. This is controlled by the µC.

Base Main Board Bottom
Base Main Board Bottom

Underside of the base unit Main PCB, showing the matching MC13109FB IC for the radio functions.

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Belkin F5U021 4-Port USB Hub

Top
Top

This is an old USB 1.1 hub that was recently retired from service on some servers. Top of the unit visible here.

Bottom Label
Bottom Label

Bottom label shows that this is a model F5U021 hub, a rather old unit.

PCB Front
PCB Front

PCB is here removed from the casing, Indicator LEDs along the bottom edge of the board, power supply is on the left. Connectors on the top edge are external power, USB host, & the 4 USB outputs. Yellow devices are polyswitch fuses for the 500mA at 5v each port must supply.

USB Hub IC
USB Hub IC

This is the USB Hub Controller IC, which is a Texas Instruments TUSB2046B device. Power filter capacitors next to the USB ports are visible here also, along with 2 of the polyswitches.

Power Supply
Power Supply

The power supply section of the unit, which supplies regulated 5v to the ports, while supplying regulated 3.3v to the hub controller IC. Large TO-220 IC is the 5v regulator. Smaller IC just under the power selector switch is the 3.3v regulator for the hub IC. The switch selects between Host powered or external power for the hub.

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Dremel MultiPro

Front
Front

Here we have a Dremel MultiPro rotary tool, a main powered 125W 33,000RPM bit of kit.

Motor Assembly
Motor Assembly

Here the field & controller assembly is removed from the casing.

Armature
Armature

Here is the armature, which rotates at up to 33,000RPM. The brushes rise against the commutator on the left, next to the bearing, the cooling fan is on the right hand side on the power output shaft, the chuck attaches at the far right end of the shaft.

Speed Controller & Brush Box
Speed Controller & Brush Box

Here is the speed controller unit, inside is an SCR phase angle speed controller, to vary the speed of the motor from 10,000RPM to the full rated speed of 33,000RPM.

Mains Filter
Mains Filter

This is the mains filter on the input to the unit, stops stray RF from the motor being radiated down the mains cable.