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Huawei E160E USB HSDPA Modem

E160E Modem
Huawei E160E Modem

Here’s an old HDSPA 3G USB modem stick that I got with a mobile phone contact many years ago. As it’s now very old tech, and I have a faster modem, not to mention that I’m no longer with Orange (Robbing <expletive>), here’s a teardown of the device!

Cover Removed
Cover Removed

The top shell is just clipped into place, while a pair of very small screws hold down the orange piece at left to hold the PCB stack in the casing. Not much to see here, but it’s clear that there’s a lot crammed into a very small space.

PCB Assembly
PCB Assembly

Here’s the PCB stack removed from the outer casing. The main antenna is on the right, attached with another small screw. Every IC on the boards is covered with an RF can. No problems there, pliers to the rescue!

SD Card Slot
SD Card Slot

Here’s the top PCB, all the shields have been removed. On the left is a Qualcomm PM6658 Power Management IC with integrated USB transceiver. This is surrounded by many of the power management circuits.
The integrated SD Card slot is on the right side. with what looks to be a local switching regulator for supply voltage. This might also provide the SIM card with it’s power supply.

PSU & SIM Contacts
PSU & SIM Contacts

The other side of the top board reveals more power management, with another switching regulator, and a truly massive capacitor at the top edge. I’m guessing this is a solid Tantalum.

Main Chipset PCB
Main Chipset PCB

The other PCB holds the main chipset & RF circuits. On the left here is a Samsung MCP K5D1G13ACH IC. This one is a multiple chip package, having 1Gbit of NAND Flash & 512Mbit of mobile SDRAM.
To it’s right is a Qualcomm RTR6285 RF Transceiver. This IC supports multiband GSM/EDGE/UMTS frequencies & also has a GPS receive amplifier included.
At bottom right is an Avago ACPM7371 Wide-Band 4×4 CDMA Power Amplifier. The external antenna connector is top right.

Main Chipset PCB Reverse
Main Chipset PCB Reverse

On the other side of the main PCB is a Qualcomm MSM6246 Baseband processor. Not sure about this one as I can’t find anything resembling a datasheet. Another micro-coax connector is in the centre, probably for factory test purposes, as it’s not accessible from the outside.
Just above the coax connector is a Qorvo RF1450 SP4T (single-pole 4-throw) High Power (34.5dBm) GSM RF Switch.
Upper right is an Avago FEM-7780 UMTS2100 4×7 Front End Module.
Under that is an RFMD RF3163 Quad-Band RF Power Amplifier Module.

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Maplin 600W “Modified Sine” Power Inverter

Maplin 600W Inverter
Maplin 600W Inverter

I’m no fan of power inverters. In my experience they’re horrifically inefficient, have power appetites that make engine starter motors look like electric toothbrushes & reduce the life expectancy of lead-acid batteries to no more than a few days.
However I have decided to do a little analysis on a cheapo “600W” model that Maplin Electronics sells.

Cover Removed
Cover Removed

After a serious amount of metallic abuse, the bottom cover eventually came off. The sheet of steel used to close the bottom of the aluminium extrusion was wedged into place with what was probably a 10 ton hydraulic press.
As can be seen from the PCB, there’s no massive 50Hz power transformer, but a pair of high frequency switching transformers. Obviously this is to lighten the weight & the cost of the magnetics, but it does nothing for the quality of the AC output waveform.

DC Input End
DC Input End

The 12v DC from the battery comes in on very heavy 8-gauge cables, this device is fused at 75A!

DC Fuses
DC Fuses

Here’s the fusing arrangement on the DC input stage, just 3 standard blade-type automotive fuses. Interestingly, these are very difficult to get at without a large hammer & some swearing, so I imagine if the user manages to blow these Maplin just expect the device to be thrown out.

Input DC-DC Switching MOSFETs
Input DC-DC Switching MOSFETs

On the input side, the DC is switched into the pair of transformers to create a bipolar high voltage DC supply.

High Voltage Rectifiers
High Voltage Rectifiers

The large rectifier diodes on the outputs of the transformers feed into the 400v 100µF smoothing capacitors.
As mains AC is obviously a bipolar waveform, I’m guessing this is generating a ±150v DC supply.

Output MOSFETs
Output MOSFETs

After the high voltage is rectified & smoothed, it’s switched through 4 more MOSFETs on the other side of the PCB to create the main AC output.

The label states this is a modified-sine output, so I’d expect something on the scope that looks like this:

Inverter Waveforms
Inverter Waveforms

Modified-sine doesn’t look as bad as just a pure square output, but I suspect it’s a little hard on inductive loads & rectifiers.

However, after connecting the scope, here’s the actual waveform:

Actual Waveform
Actual Waveform

It’s horrific. It’s not even symmetrical. There isn’t even a true “neutral” either. The same waveform (in antiphase) is on the other mains socket terminal. This gives an RMS output voltage of 284v. Needless to say I didn’t try it under load, as I don’t possess anything I don’t mind destroying. (This is when incandescent lamps are *really* useful. Bloody EU ;)).

About the only thing that it’s accurate at reproducing is the 50Hz output, which it does pretty damn well.

System Microcontroller
System Microcontroller

As is usual these days, the whole system is controlled via a microcontroller.

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Wouxun KG-UV950P Teardown & Analysis

Following on from my review, here are some internal views & detail on the components used in this radio. Below is an overview of the main PCB with the top plate removed from the radio.

Cover Removed
Cover Removed
RF Final Amplifier Stage
RF Final Amplifier Stage

Most visible are these MOSFETs, which are Mitsubishi RD70HVF1 VHF/UHF power devices.  Rated for a maximum of 75W output power at 12.5v (absolute maximum of 150W, these are used well within their power ratings. They are joined to the PCB with heavy soldering, with bypass caps tacked right on to the leads.

RF Pre Drivers
RF Pre Drivers

Here is the RF pre-driver stage, with intermediate transistors hidden under the small brass heatspreader.

Power Section
Power Section

In the top left corner of the radio, near the power input leads, is the power supply & audio amplifier section. Clearly visible are the pair of LA4425A 5W audio power amplifier ICs, these drive the speakers on the top of the radio. Either side of these parts are a 7809 & a 7805 – both linear regulators providing +9v & +5v logic supplies respectively. The large TO220 package device is a KIA378R08PI 3A LDO regulator with ON/OFF control, this one outputs +8v. Just visible in the top right corner are the sockets for the speaker connections.

DTMF Circuits
DTMF Circuits

Here are the two ICs for dealing with DTMF tones, they are HM9170 receivers.

Glue Logic
Glue Logic

In the corner next to the interface jack, there are some CD4066B Quad Bilateral switches. These make sense since the interface jack has more than a single purpose, these will switch signals depending on what is connected.

RF Section
RF Section

Here are visible the RF cans for the oscillators, the crystals visible next to the can at the top. The shields are soldered on, so no opening these unfortunately.
Also visible in this image is a CMX138A Audio Scrambler & Sub-Audio Signalling processor. This IC deals with the Voice Inversion Scrambling feature of the radio, & processes the incoming audio before being sent to the modulator.

Output Filter Network
Output Filter Network

Shown here is the RF output filter network, this radio uses relays for switching instead of PIN diodes, I imagine for cost reasons. The relay closest to the RF output socket has had a slight accident 🙂 This is slated to be replaced soon.

RF Output Jack
RF Output Jack

Finally, the RF output jack.

Audio Speakers
Audio Speakers

Here the speakers are shown, attached to the bottom of the top plate. They are both rated 8Ω 1W.