Posted on Leave a comment

Portable Hearing Induction Loop

Induction Loop
Induction Loop

These units are used to broadcast local audio, such as from a public address system or local microphone. They accomplish this by producing a modulated magnetic field that a hearing aid is capable of picking up.

Back Panel
Back Panel

Not many controls on this bit of equipment. A bi-colour LED for status indications, a microphone, external audio input, charging input & a power switch.

Internals
Internals

Popping the cover off reveals a small lead-acid battery, 2.1Ah at 12v. This is used when the loop is unplugged.

Main PCB
Main PCB

Here’s the main PCB, which takes care of the audio & battery charging. The inductive loop itself is just visible as the tape-covered wire bundle around the edge of the casing.

Audio & Power Input
Audio & Power Input

Here’s the input section of the main PCB. The microphone input is handled by a SSM2166 front-end preamplifier from Analog Devices.

Power Amplifier
Power Amplifier

This audio is then fed into a TDA2003 10W Mono Power Amplifier IC, which directly drives the induction coil as if it were a speaker. Any suitable receiving coil & amplifier can then receive the signal & change it back into audio.

Posted on Leave a comment

17mm µMonitor

I’ve had a couple of viewfinder CRT modules for a while, & haven’t done much with them, so I decided to make a very small B&W monitor.

CRT
CRT

I ordered a small transparent ABS box when I made a large order with Farnell, that turned out to be just about the perfect size for the project! The CRT & PCB barely fit into the space. The face of the CRT itself is about 17mm across.

Module Installed
Module Installed

Here’s the main PCB & tube fully installed into the case. Barely enough room for a regulator left over!
Power is provided by a simple LM7809 IC to take a standard 12v input.

Module Rear
Module Rear

Rear of the case, showing the fit of the control board.

Connections
Connections

Here’s the back of the monitor, with the DC input jack & a 3.5mm 4-pole jack for audio & video. This allows simple connection to many devices, including the one I’ll use the most – the Raspberry Pi.

Completed
Completed

Completed monitor. Audio is handled by a very small 20mm speaker, currently mounted just below the CRT face.
Current draw from a 13.8v supply is 117mA.

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Uniden UBC92XLT Teardown

One bit of my equipment that I’ve never looked into is my scanner, a handheld Uniden unit. I got this when Maplin Electronics had them on special offer a few years ago.

Uniden Scanner
Uniden Scanner

Here’s the scanner itself, roughly the same size as a usual HT.

Back Cover Removed
Back Cover Removed

Here the back cover has been removed, and the main RF board is visible at the top of the stack. Unfortunately the shielding cans are soldered on this unit, so no looking under there 🙁
On the right hand side of the board next to the antenna input is the main RF filter network, and it’s associated switching. The RF front end is under the shield closest to the front edge.

Controls & 3.3v Regulator
Controls & 3.3v Regulator

On the other side of the PCB is the Volume & Squelch potentiometers, along with a dedicated 3.3v switching supply. An NJM2360A High Precision DC/DC converter IC controls this one. A 3.3v test point is visible next to the regulator.

RF Board Reverse
RF Board Reverse

Here’s the backside of the RF board, some more interesting parts here. There’s a pair of NJM3404A Single Supply Dual Op-Amp ICs, and a TK10931V Dual AM/FM IF Discriminator IC. This is the one that does all the back-end radio functionality. The audio amplifier for the internal speaker & external headphone jack is also on this PCB, top left. A board-to-board interconnect links this radio board with the main control board underneath.

Control PCB Front
Control PCB Front

Here’s the front of the control PCB, nothing much to see here, just the LCD & membrane keypad contacts.

Control PCB Reverse
Control PCB Reverse

And here’s the reverse side of the control board. All the interesting bits are here. The main microcontroller is on the right, a Renesas M38D59GF, a fairly powerful MCU, with onboard LCD drive, A/D converter, serial interface, 60K of ROM & 2K of RAM. It’s 6.143MHz clock crystal is just below it.
The mating connector for the RF board is in the centre here.

There is also a Microchip 24LC168 16KB I²C EEPROM next to the main microcontroller. This is probably for storing user settings, frequencies, etc.

EEPROM
EEPROM

The rest of this board is dedicated to battery charging and power supply, in the centre is a dual switching controller, I can’t figure out the numbers on the tiny SOT23 components in here, but this is dealing with the DC 6v input & to the left of that is the circuitry for charging the NiMH cells included with the scanner.

PSU
PSU

The last bit of this PCB is a BU2092FV Serial In / Parallel Out 4 channel driver. Not sure what this one is doing, it might be doing some signal multiplexing for the RF board interface. Unfortunately the tracks from this IC are routed on the inner layers of the board so they can’t be traced out.