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Sony HVF-2000P Viewfinder Teardown & Composite Video Hack

Rating Plate
Rating Plate

Well, it’s time for another viewfinder hack! I’ve been after one of these for a while, this is from an early 1980’s era Sony Trinicon camera, and instead of the tiny ½” round CRT display, these have a 1.5″ square CRT – a Matsushita 40CB4. Luckily I managed to score a pair of these from eBay for very little money. Update: The second camera’s viewfinder module turned out to have a dead flyback transformer, but at least I have a good spare CRT & the rest of the support components. More to come later on the teardown of the camera itself.

Mirror & Eyecup Assembly
Mirror & Eyecup Assembly

The eyecup assembly with the magnifying lens & turning mirror is easy to remove, with clips & a single screw holding it onto the CRT holder sticking out of the side of the main casing.

Top Cover Removed
Top Cover Removed

Removing some screws around the case allows the top cover to be removed, revealing the electronics. There’s certainly more in here than the later camera viewfinders, in this unit there are two boards slotted together with a board-to-board interconnect at the bottom. The CRT is at the top of the photo, hiding inside the plastic housing & deflection yoke assembly.

Bare PCBs & CRT
Bare PCBs & CRT

Here’s the CRT & one of the control boards removed from the case, having been stripped of the heatshrink tube that held the final anode lead in place. Just like on larger CRTs, this viewfinder has the final anode on a cavity connector fused into the bell, instead of being led out to a pin on the base. This is probably due to the much higher anode voltage of 5kV, a big jump from the 2kV on the ½” round tubes.

40CB4 CRT Label
40CB4 CRT Label

Yup, it’s definitely the elusive 40CB4. Apparently these CRTs are still manufactured to this day for professional camera viewfinders, as the resolution of this small vacuum tube is still better than similarly sized modern tech such as LCDs or OLEDs. The phosphor used is type P4 – ZnS:Ag+(Zn,Cd)S:Ag, with an aluminized overcoat.

Bare 40CB4 CRT
Bare 40CB4 CRT

After the base connector & deflection yoke are removed from the tube, the very long neck can be seen, this long glass neck apparently giving better focus & resolution than the stubbier tubes.

Electron Gun
Electron Gun

The electron gun is the usual single unit as usually found in monochrome tubes.

Deflection Board
Deflection Board

The bottom board in the assembly has all the control circuitry for the CRT, including the HA11244 deflection IC, composite sync separator & vertical deflection drive circuit. There are also circuits here to display a video waveform on the CRT, along with iris & white balance markers.

Horizontal Board
Horizontal Board

The other board has the horizontal drive circuitry, along with the video input amplifier. Despite the attempt to miniaturize the entire assembly, these are still well packed boards. Some of the resistors & diodes are bussed together in custom SIL hybrid modules to save PCB space. Like all the other CRT viewfinders, these units are meant for viewing via a mirror – the horizontal deflection coil connections need to be reversed to show a correct image without the mirror. The Red & Blue wires to the yoke need to be swapped here.

Flyback Transformer
Flyback Transformer

The horizontal board on this unit also supports the flyback transformer, which is massive compared to the other viewfinder circuits. Biasing, focus & filament supplies for the CRT are also derived from this transformer, via auxiliary windings.

Boards Connected
Boards Connected

The boards slot together in the centre to form the fully operational circuit.

Video Input
Video Input

Out of the 3 plugs emerging from the cable feeding the viiewfinder, only this one is important, on the horizontal drive board. Black is ground, Brown +8.5v & red is composite video input. There’s also a resistor tied into the positive rail to the video input pin, which pulls it high to 8.5v – this is R1 right next to this connector. Desolder this 22K resistor to help protect anything feeding a signal into the unit, like a RPi, it’s not needed for normal operation.

Fallout!
Fallout!

As usual for a CRT post, the Fallout loading screen on the display. The picture quality isn’t as good as it should be, probably due to the noisy buck-converter I have rigged up for testing. If it doesn’t get better with a linear regulator, I’ll start replacing the 39 year old electrolytic capacitors. Current draw is 130mA at 7.5v. Schematics for this unit & the CRT datasheet are available below:



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Goodmans Quadro 902 Composite Video Mod

CRT Module
CRT Module

Here’s the CRT & it’s drive board removed from the main chassis. Nicely modular this unit, all the individual modules (radio, tape, TV), are separate. This is effectively a TV itself, all the tuner & IF section are onboard, unlike in other vintage units I’ve modified, where the tuner & IF has been on a separate board. There’s a 3-pin header bottom centre for the tuning potentiometer, and external antenna input jack. The internal coax for the built in antenna has been desoldered from the board here. here a the usual controls on the back for adjusting brightness, contrast & V Hold, all the other adjustments are trimmers on the PCB.
Unfortunately after 30+ years of storage, this didn’t work on first power up, neither of the oscillators for vertical or horizontal deflection would lock onto the incoming signal, but a couple of hours running seemed to improve things greatly. The numerous electrolytic capacitors in this unit were probably in need of some reforming after all this time, although out of all of them, only 21 are anything to do with the CRT itself.

Anode Cap
Anode Cap

Here’s the anode side of the unit, with the small flyback transformer. The rubber anode cap has become very hard with age, so I’ll replace this with a decent silicone one from another dead TV. The Horizontal Output Transistor (a 2SC2233 NPN type) & linearity coil are visible at the bottom right corner of the board. Unfortunately, the disgusting yellow glue has been used to secure some of the wiring & large electrolytics, this stuff tends to turn brown with age & become conductive, so it has to be removed. Doing this is a bit of a pain though. It’s still a little bit flexible in places, and rock hard in others. Soaking in acetone softens it up a little & makes it easier to detach from the components.

Neck PCB
Neck PCB

There’s little on the neck board apart from a few resistors, forming the limiting components for the video signal, and the focus divider of 1MΩ & 470KΩ feeding G3. No adjustable focus on this unit. There’s also a spark gap between the cathode line & ground, to limit the filament to cathode voltage. The flyback transformer is nestled into the heatsink used by the horizontal output transistor & a voltage regulator transistor.

Tube Details
Tube Details

The CRT is a Samsung Electron Devices 4ADC4, with a really wide deflection angle. It’s a fair bit shorter than the Chinese CRT I have which is just a little larger, with a neck tube very thin indeed for the overall tube size.
Unusually, while the filament voltage is derived from the flyback transformer as usual, it’s rectified into DC in this unit, passing through a 1Ω resistor before the filament connection. I measured 5.3v here. The glow from the filament is barely visible even in the dark.

Electron Gun 1
Electron Gun 1

The electron gun is the usual for a monochrome tube, with 7 pins on the seal end.

Electron Gun 2
Electron Gun 2

The electrodes here from left are Final Anode, G3 (Focus Grid), Accelerating Anode, G2 (Screen Grid), G1 (Control Grid). The cathode & filament are hidden inside G1. In operation there’s about 250v on G2, and about 80v on G3.

Chipset
Chipset

The chipset used here is all NEC, starting with a µPC1366C Video IF Processor, which receives the IF signal from the tuner module to the left. This IC outputs the standard composite signal, and a modulated sound signal.
This then splits off to a µPC1382C Sound IF Processor & Attenuator IC, which feeds the resulting sound through the two pin header at the right bottom edge of the board to the audio amplifier in the chassis.
The composite video signal is fed through a discrete video amplifier with a single 2SC2229 transistor before going to the CRT cathode.
The remaining IC is a µPC1379C Sync Signal Processor, containing the sync separator, this is generating the required waveforms to drive the CRT deflection systems from another tap off the composite video line.
From this chip I can assume the unit was built around 1986, since this is the only date code on any of the semiconductors. Besides these 3 ICs, the rest of the circuit is all discrete components, which are well-crammed into the small board space.
There are 5 trimmer potentiometers on the board here, I’ve managed to work out the functions of nearly all of them:

  • SVR1: IF Gain Adjust
  • SVR2: H. Hold
  • SVR3: V. Size
  • SVR4: B+ Voltage Adjust
  • SVR5: Tuner Frequency Alignment? It’s in series with the tuning potentiometer in the chassis.
PCB Bottom
PCB Bottom

The PCB bottom shows the curved track layout typical of a hand taped out board. The soldermask is starting to flake off in places due to age, and there a couple of bodge wires completing a few ground traces. Respinning a board in those days was an expensive deal! Surprisingly, after all this time I’ve found no significant drift in the fixed resistors, but the carbon track potentiometers are drifiting significantly – 10KΩ pots are measuring as low as 8KΩ out of circuit. These will have to be replaced with modern versions, since there are a couple in timing-sensitive places, like the vertical & horizontal oscillator circuits.

Anode Cap Replaced
Anode Cap Replaced

Here the anode cap has been replaced with a better silicone one from another TV. This should help keep the 6kV on the CRT from making an escape. This was an easy fix – pulling the contact fork out of the cap with it’s HT lead, desoldering the fork & refitting with the new cap in place.

Here I’ve replaced the important trimmers with new ones. Should help stabilize things a little.

Composite Injection Mod
Composite Injection Mod

Injecting a video signal is as easy as the other units. Pin 3 of the µPC1366C Video IF Processor is it’s output, so the track to Pin 3 is cut and a coax is soldered into place to feed in an external signal.

CRT In Operation
CRT In Operation

After hooking up a Raspberry Pi, we have display! Not bad after having stood idle for 30+ years.

Datasheets for the important ICs are available below:
[download id=”5690″]
[download id=”5693″]
[download id=”5696″]

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STVG-502 Karaoke Machine CRT

Image Display

Here’s the CRT circuitry from a tossed STVG-502 Karaoke Machine, which got a good soaking in Manchester’s brilliantly wet weather before I managed to get hold of it:

Main PCB
Main PCB

I didn’t do a full teardown of this unit, since it was soaking wet & smelled rather badly of sour milk, so instead I quickly gutted it for the useful parts. These machines are a combination of a CD+G player, CRT composite monitor for displaying the CD+G lyrics & a small audio amplifier & 3W speaker. Power is provided from the mains via a transformer, with both 12 & 24v windings. One half of the board has the audio amplifier sections, the other the CRT drive, running from the 12v & 24v supplies respectively. I chopped off the audio section, as that wasn’t needed.

Linear Regulator
Linear Regulator

On this huge heatsink is what I originally thought was the horizontal drive transistor is actually a 12v linear regulator – the board gets fed 16v AC. This is then run through a rectifier which will produce an approx 22v rail, and after the smaller transistor on the left used for power switching. The 22v then gets dropped through a 1/2W 1Ω resistor, then the linear regulator drops it down to 12v for the rest of the circuit – dissipating a goodly amount of power in the process.

Horizontal Output Transistor
Horizontal Output Transistor

This is in fact the horizontal drive transistor, a 2SD613, which according to the datasheet, is intended for audio amplifier output stage applications, not CRT drive. Regardless, it’s an 85v 6A NPN transistor, and does get a bit on the warm side, but was never given a heatsink from the factory.

CRT Drive IC
CRT Drive IC

All the drive signals for the CRT are taken care of by this single DIP IC – a CD1379CP from Silicore. Considering the older CRT-based devices I have, with entire boards twice the size of this one dedicated to discrete components required to drive a CRT, this is definitely an advance in technology. Very few external components are being used, and no custom magnetics.

Video Input
Video Input

The video signal comes in from the CD+G player module on this connector, it’s a standard composite input. The composite video is fed into an amplifier after the controller IC. This video amp is powered from a 140v rail from the flyback transformer, to give enough signal to drive the CRT cathode.

LOPT
LOPT

The high voltage transformer is a BSH8-N5513L, I’ve not been able to find any data on this, but it looks like a standard off the shelf transformer from the listings on the Chinese supplier sites. There are very few support components around here, just a couple of diodes to rectify the high voltage focus supply, and no linearity coil. Weirdly, the 1st accelerating anode of the tube is grounded in this circuit. Very few adjustments are provided, most are set with fixed resistors to keep the cost low.

The CRT

14SX3Y4 CRT
14SX3Y4 CRT

Here’s the CRT, it’s a 5″ monochrome model. I’ve not been able to find much data on this either.

Bent Electron Gun
Bent Electron Gun

Seems the gents in the Shenzhen factory were having a bit of an off day when this one was made – the electron gun assembly is actually tilted in the neck of the tube – as a result the spot formed with no deflection is far from the centre of the screen. This tube does still produce a pretty good picture though, this manufacturing error is easily corrected for with the positioning magnets on the deflection yoke.

Final Mods

PCB Mods
PCB Mods

I’ve installed a couple of mod wires on the bottom of the PCB to get this to work outside the original application, without the room heater of a linear regulator in circuit this will run fine from a 12v supply. The PCB quality is a bit naff – even quick heating with a soldering iron makes tracks fall off the laminated paper board.

Image Display
Image Display

Image quality is surprisingly good for the cheapest CRT-based monitor I’ve ever seen, I figured a Fallout reference was required here; anyone for a proper CRT-based PipBoy? 😉 Shame the phosphor isn’t green.