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Camping Support Trolley – Some Build Progress

Since I do festivals every year, along with a couple of other camping trips if the weather is good enough, I’ve been taking equipment with me for years in flight cases to make things more comfortable. Things like a large battery to power lights & device charging, an old Eberspacher diesel heater for the times when the weather isn’t great, and an inverter to run the pumps built into airbeds.

Red Diesel / Heating Oil is my fuel of choice for camping purposes, as it’s about the safest fuel around, unlike Butane/LPG it is not explosive, will not burn very readily unless it’s atomized properly & it’s very cheap. Paraffin is an alternative fuel, but it’s expensive in the UK, at about £12 per 5L.
The Hexamine-based tablet fuels the UK festivals promote is nasty stuff, and the resulting combustion products are nastier still. (Things like Hydrogen Cyanide, Formaldehyde, Ammonia, NOX). They also leave a sticky black grok on every cooking pot that’s damn near impossible to remove. Meths / Trangia stoves are perfectly usable, but the flame is totally invisible, and the flammability of alcohol has always made me nervous when you’ve got a small pot of the stuff boiling while it’s in operation in the middle of a campsite filled with sloshed festival goers. A single well-placed kick could start a massive fire.

Previous System
Previous System

Over the years the gear has evolved and grown in size, so I decided building everything into one unit on wheels would be the best way forward. I’ve been working on this for some time, so it’s time to get some of the details on the blog! Above you can see the system used for last year’s camping, the heater is separate, with a 25L drum of heating oil, the battery is underneath the flight case containing all the power components, and it’s currently charging All The Things.

Overview
Overview

Above is the new unit almost finished, the bottom frame is a standard eBay-grade 4-wheel trolley with a few modifications of my own, with a new top box built from 12mm hardwood marine plywood. This top is secured in place with coach bolts through the 25mm angle iron of the trolley base. The essential carbon monoxide detector is fitted at the corner.

Internal View
Internal View

The inside gets a bit busy with everything crammed in. The large Yuasa 200Ah lead-acid battery is at the far end, with it’s isolation switch. Right in the middle is the Eberspacher heater with it’s hot air ducting. I’ve fitted my usual 12/24v dual voltage system here, with the 24v rail generated from a large 1200W DC-DC converter.

Heater Vent
Heater Vent

The hot air duct for the heater is fed out through a standard vent in the front. Very handy for drying out after a wet day.

Main Bus Bars & Solar Controller
Main Bus Bars & Solar Controller

Here’s a closeup of the distribution bus bars, with both negative rails tied together in the centre to keep the positives as far away from each other as possible, to reduce the possibility of a short circuit between the two when working on the wiring. The EpEver Tracer 4210A MPPT Solar Charge Controller is on the left, tucked into the corner. This controller implements the main circuit protection for the battery, having a 40A limit. Individual circuits are separately fused where required. Solar input on this unit is going to be initially provided by a pair of 100W flexible panels in series for a 48v solar bus, the flexible panels are essential here as most of the festivals I attend do not allow glass of any kind onsite, not to mention the weight of rigid panels is a pain.

DC Output Sockets
DC Output Sockets

I’ve stuck with the 3-pin XLR plugs for power in this design, giving both the 12v rail, 24v rail & ground.

Inverter Outputs
Inverter Outputs

Tucked under the DC outputs are a pair of panel sockets for the 600W inverter. This cheapo Maplin unit is only usually used to pump up air beds, so I’m not expecting anyone to pull anything near max output, but a warning label always helps.

Power Socket Wiring
Power Socket Wiring

Behind the front panel is the hardwiring for the power sockets. The DC jacks are connected together using 2mm solid copper wire, bent into bus bars.The mains wiring underneath is a simple radial circuit straight from the inverter. The large cylinder on the left is a hydraulic pump from a BMW Z3, which runs a hydraulic cylinder for lifting the lid of the top box, used simply because I had one in the box of junk.

Fuel Pump
Fuel Pump

External fuelling is dealt with by a small gear pump, this is used to fuel up the Optimus Stove & Petromax Lantern. This is in fact a car windscreen wash pump, but it has coped well with pumping hydrocarbons, it currently has a small leak on the hose connections, but the seals are still entirely intact.

Remote Relays
Remote Relays

There’s a small remote relay module here, for switching the DC output for lighting & the heater from afar. Very useful when it’s dark, since there’s no need to fumble around looking for a light switch. A car-style fob on my keyring instead.

Heater Timer
Heater Timer

Since the Eberspacher 701 controller I have is an ex-BT version, it’s very limited in it’s on time, a separate timeswitch is fitted to control the heater automatically. Being able to return to a nice warm tent is always a bonus.
Just to the left can be seen the top ball joint for the hydraulic cylinder that lifts the top of the box.

Battery Charger
Battery Charger

The final large component is the battery charger. This unit will maintain the battery when the trolley isn’t being used.

Router Motherboard
Router Motherboard

On the left side is the old Atom motherbaord used to provide a 4G router system. This unit gets it’s internet feed from a UMTS dongle & provides a local WiFi network for high speed connectivity. The bottom of the hydraulic cylinder is visible in the bottom right corner.

Fuel Tank Completed
Fuel Tank Completed

Since the Eberspacher obviously needs fuel, a tank was required. In previous years I’ve used jerry cans for this purpose, but this trolley is supposed to have everything onboard, for less setup time. The tank is constructed from 3mm steel plate, MIG welded together at the seams to create a ~40L capacity. The filler neck is an eBay purchase in Stainless Steel. No photos of the tank being welded together, as I was aiming to beat sunset & it’s very difficult to operate a camera with welding gauntlets on 😉

The tank is the same width as the trolley frame, so some modification was required, having the wheels welded directly to the sides of the tank. This makes the track wider at the rear, increasing stability.

Fuel Dip Tubes
Fuel Dip Tubes

A quick view inside the tank through the level sender port shows the copper dip tubes for fuel supply to the heater, and an external fuel hose for my other fuel-powered camping gear. These tubes stop about 10mm from the bottom of the tank to stop any moisture or dirt from being drawn into the pumps.

Fuel Feeds & Level Sender Port
Fuel Feeds & Level Sender Port

The top of the tank is drilled for the fuel fittings & the level sender and has already been painted here. The 1mm base plate has yet to be painted.

Level Sender Installed
Level Sender Installed

Touching up the paint & fitting the sender is the last job for this part. The mesh bottom of the trolley has been replaced by a 1mm steel sheet to support the other parts, mainly the heater. Fuel lines are run in polyurethane tubing to the fuel pumps.

All the instruments & controls are on a single panel, with the Eberspacher thermostat, external fuelling port & pump switch, inverter control, the solar controller monitor panel, cover buttons, router controls, compressed air & fuel gauges.

Panel Wiring
Panel Wiring

As is usual behind instrument panels, there’s a rat’s nest of wiring. There’s still the pressure gauge to connect up for the compressed air system, and the nut on one of the router buttons is such a tight fit I’ve not managed to get it into place yet.

Eberspacher Fuel Pump
Eberspacher Fuel Pump

The support components for the Eberspacher heater are mounted underneath the baseplate, with the fuel dosing pump secured to a rail with a pair of cable ties, and some foam tape around to isolate the constant clicking noise these pumps create in operation. The large black cylinder is the combustion air intake silencer, with the stainless steel exhaust pipe to the left of that. Silencing these heaters is essential – they sound like a jet engine without anything to deaden the noise. Most of this is generated from the side-channel blower used in the burner.

Eberspacher Exhaust
Eberspacher Exhaust

Bolted to the underside are a pair of exhaust silencers, one is an Eberspacher brand, the other is Webasto, since the latter type are better at reducing the exhaust noise. Connections are sealed with commerical exhaust assembly paste, the usual clamps supplied do not do a good enough job of stopping exhaust leaks.

Next update to come when I get the parts in for the air compressor system.

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nb Tanya Louise Propulsion Rebuild – Part 1

New Coupling Hub
New Coupling Hub

Time to get on with the job now the parts have arrived! Above is the new coupling hub, as can be seen compared to the old one that I previously posted about, this one has it’s full complement of splines.

Rubber Element
Rubber Element

The hub bolts into the centre of this rubber coupling, which itself locates on pins attached to the engine’s flywheel. This part wasn’t damaged so it’s being reused with the new hub.

Hub Installed
Hub Installed

Here’s the hub installed on the input shaft of the main hydraulic pump stack, the pair of holes on the side of the hub are for the grub screws that secure the coupling on the splines. These screws coming loose are what destroyed the old coupling.

Flywheel
Flywheel

Here’s the engine flywheel, where the rubber coupling normally sits. The mounting pins have been greased ready to accept the rest of the coupling.

Doughnut
Doughnut

Here’s the rubber element mounted on the pins – there’s nothing holding it there in normal operation apart from the mating side of the coupling with the pump.

Unfortunately the weather here in Manchester has prevented us from getting any further – more t0 come when the rain stops!

73s for now folks!

 

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nbTanya Louise Drive Failure

As I have posted about before, the main propulsion system onboard the boat is all hydraulic. To get the drive from the flywheel of the engine to the hydraulic pump stack, a custom drive plate was machined by Centa Transmissions over in Yorkshire, and a Centaflex A coupling was fitted to this.

Centaflex A Coupling
Centaflex A Coupling

This coupling is a big rubber doughnut, bolted to a centre hub of steel. The steel hub is splined onto the input shaft of the hydraulic pump stack.

Pump Stack
Pump Stack

The problem we’ve had is that to prevent the coupling from riding along the splines in operation, a pair of giant grub screws are provided in the side of the centre steel boss, that compress the splines to lock the device in place. These screws are a nightmare to get tightened down (the engineer from Centa who originally came to survey the system said we’d probably shear some tools off trying).

Because of this, the grub screws have loosened over the last 350-odd hours of running & this has had the effect of totally destroying the splines in the hub.

Spline Remains
Spline Remains

Here’s the backside of the centre boss, with what remains of the splines, the figure-8 shaped gap on the right is where the securing grub screws deform the steel to lock the coupling into place.

No More Splines
No More Splines

Here’s the other side of the coupling, showing the damage. The splines have effectively been totally removed, as if I’d gone in there with a boring bar on the lathe. Luckily this part isn’t too expensive to replace, and no damage was done to the input shaft of the hydraulic pump stack (Mega ££££). Quite luckily, this damage got to the point of failure while running the engine on the mooring, so it didn’t leave us stranded somewhere without motive power.

More to come when the new coupling arrives!