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Eberspacher Controller & Remote

7-Day Programmer
7-Day Programmer

The Eberspacher heaters can be controlled with a single switch, but it’s more convenient to have some temperature control & the option of a timer. Above is an ex-BT 701 series controller, with built in 7-day programmer. Being an ex-BT van version though, it’ll only switch the heater on for 1 hour at a time.
To get around this slight niggle, I fitted a bypass toggle switch.

Remote Control
Remote Control

For a bit of extra convenience, I got an RF remote controlled relay module from eBay (£5).
This allows me to switch things on remotely, so I can return to a nice toasty tent while camping.
There is an official RF remote for Eberspacher heaters, but I’ve no doubt they’re hideously expensive.

RF Receiver
RF Receiver

Here’s the receiver PCB, there’s an EEPROM & a microcontroller onboard for handling the codes the remotes send, but as the number has been scrubbed off the micro, no data there. This uses a standard RF receiver module.

RF Remote
RF Remote

Here’s the remote itself, this uses a 12v battery instead of a 3v lithium cell. A little of a pain since these batteries can be a bit pricey.
As this RF system operates on 315MHz, it’s technically illegal in the UK, but I was unable to find a 433MHz version with the features required. Nevermind ;).

Controller Internals
Controller Internals

Here’s the module installed in the controller casing. I have since run the antenna wire around the edge of the case to try & get the furthest range on receive. The relay contacts are just paralleled across the bypass switch, so when the relay energizes the heater fires up.
Luckily the thermostatic control portion of the 701 programmer is operational even when heating mode is not active.

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Wearable Raspberry Pi Part 1

Overview
Overview

Here is the project I’m currently working on. A completely wearable computing platform based on the Raspberry Pi & the WiFi Pineapple.

Above can be seen the general overview of the current unit.

On the left:

  • Alfa AWUS036NHA USB High Power WiFi Network Interface
  • 512MB Model B Raspberry Pi, 16GB SD card, running Raspbian & LXDE Desktop. Overclocked to 1GHz.

On the right:

  • WiFi Pineapple router board
  • USB 3G card.

The WiFi, Pineapple & 3G all have external antenna connections for a better signal & the whole unit locks onto the belt with a pair of clips.
The Raspberry Pi is using the composite video output to the 7″ LCD I am using, running at a resolution of 640×480. This gives a decent amount of desktop space while retaining readability of the display.

The case itself is a Pelican 1050 hard case, with it’s rubber lining removed. The belt clips are also a custom addition.

Connections
Connections

Here are the connections to the main unit, on the left is the main power connector, supplying +5v & +12v DC. The plug on the right is an 8-pin connection that carries two channels of video, mono audio & +12v power to the display.
Currently the only antenna fitted is the 3G.

Connectors
Connectors

Closeup of the connections for power, audio & video. The toggle switch is redundant & will soon be replaced with a 3.5mm stereo jack for headphones, as an alternative to the mono audio built into the display.

Test Run
Test Run

Current state of test. Here the unit is running, provided with an internet connection through the Pineapple’s 3G radio, funneled into the Pi via it’s ethernet connection.

Pi Goodness!
Pi Goodness!

Running on a car reversing camera monitor at 640×480 resolution. This works fairly well for the size of the monitor & the text is still large enough to be readable.

 

Stay tuned for Part 2 where I will build the power supply unit.

 

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Laser Diode Driver

Connection

Closeup
Closeup

The parts arrived for my adjustable laser diode driver! Components here are an LM317K with heatsink, 100Ω 10-turn precision potentiometer, 15-turn counting dial & a 7-pin matching plug & socket.

Driver Schematic
Driver Schematic

Here is the schematic for the driver circuit. I have used a 7-pin socket for provisions for active cooling of bigger laser diodes. R1 sets the maximum current to the laser diode, while R2 is the power adjustment. This is all fed from the main 12v Ni-Cd pack built into the PSU. The LM317 is set up as a constant current source in this circuit.

Installed
Installed

Here the power adjust dial & the laser head connector have been installed in the front panel. Power is switched to the driver with the toggle switch to the right of the connector.

Regulator
Regulator

The LM317 installed on the rear panel of the PSU with it’s heatsink.

Connection
Connection

Connections to the regulator, the output is fully isolated from the heatsink & rear panel.