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Narrowboating Quickies – Webasto Heater Exhaust Rehash

Since rebuilding the burner for the Webasto water heater on board nb Tanya Louise, I figured it was about time I sorted the exhaust out as well. The standard Eberspacher / Webasto type exhaust system components are shit. Nothing is properly gas tight, no matter how you build the system, due to how the pipe is constructed – it’s spiral ribbed stainless flexi tube, and even proper clamps don’t exert enough force to create a gas seal on the fittings, leaving gaps in the spiral for exhaust to leak out. Unfortunately I don’t have a photo of the old exhaust setup – it was however awful.

So to fix the problem of the messy setup, and to fix the issue of leaking exhaust gases, I got to work creating a custom system from 22mm copper pipe, brazing all the joints together.

Completed Exhaust
Completed Exhaust

Here’s the completed system, matched to the location of the heater unit in the engine bay, and the exhaust skin fitting. The ends of the pipe are expanded with a hydraulic tool to allow them to fit onto the heater & skin fitting, these being too large for 22mm pipe normally.

Brazed Muffler
Brazed Muffler

The muffler is also fully brazed to keep exhaust gases inside the exhaust. These are supplied just crimped together as they’re intended for use under vehicles. A sealed marine grade exhaust silencer is available, but very expensive. Again the copper pipe ends are expanded with the hydraulic tool to allow them to fit into place on the stainless tails. Brazing was done with 55% silver brazing rod.

Fibreglass Wrap
Fibreglass Wrap

To keep the heat away from sensitive parts in the engine bay, the entire assembly has been wrapped in fibreglass insulation tape, and secured with stainless steel ties. It’s important to use only stainless in these applications – the fibreglass wrap will hold any moisture in contact with all the parts, and mild steel will rapidly convert back into Iron Oxide 😉

Heater End
Heater End

The heater itself is on the other side of the plywood board in the photo, the cooling water pipework can be seen on the lower left, along with the diesel dosing pump. The main fuel tank is just visible in the bottom right corner.

Skin Fitting Connection
Skin Fitting Connection

The other end is sized for a snug fit onto the exhaust skin fitting, just astern of the old oil cooler. This is set to be removed at some stage, and be replaced with an engine bay blower for ventilation.

Silencer
Silencer

In the corner, next to the bulkhead sits the silencer.

In all, this setup also made the heater quieter, probably due to the longer length of exhaust pipework, which is now about 1.5 metres from the heater outlet to the skin fitting. This is a bonus – the exhaust of these heaters without any silencing sounds like a jet engine!

 

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Covid-19 Lockdown Experiments – eBay 1-1000MHz 3W Wideband Amplifier Power Test

Since the entire country is on Coronavirus lockdown at the moment, I figured it was time to get round to finishing off a couple of small blog posts while waiting for the restrictions to be lifted 😉

3W 1GHz Amplifier
3W 1GHz Amplifier

This is a small two-stage linear amplifier module available on eBay fairly cheap for SDR operation.This unit claims 3W (34.8dBm) power output at 0dBm input, however not surprisingly, this amplifier isn’t quite flat across the frequency range.

Frequency Response
Frequency Response

Here’s the readout from an R&S FSV7 spectrum analyser. The amplifier is being driven from the analyser’s tracking generator at 0dBm, and the output is fed back into the input via 60dB of external power attenuation. The span here is 1MHz-1GHz, and at the top end the frequency response is already beginning to drop off a cliff – the 1GHz rating appears to be the 3dB down point. The rated output power of 3W appears to only be attainable below 100MHz for the rated 0dBm input, after that it drops pretty quickly to about -3dB.

FrequencyOutput - dBmOutput - W
100MHz34.742.97
144MHz34.42.75
200MHz33.812.40
315MHz32.591.81
433MHz31.461.39
500MHz30.911.23
600MHz30.871.22
700MHz31.041.27
800MHz30.951.24
900MHz30.241.05
1000MHz26.860.48
Extended Span
Extended Span

Extending the frequency span of the analyser shows the roll off at high frequency – this module really isn’t usable above the rated frequency range.

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NEC LT-25 DLP Projector Autopsy

Top Cover Removed
Top Cover Removed

Time for another projector! This one was brought to me with a fault, described as a shadow in the middle of the image, shortly after the lamp was replaced after exploding. This is an older DLP projector, with a UHP mercury lamp. I’ve already removed the top cover of the projector here, showing the internals. The light engine is along the front of the unit, with the lamp on the right. The main control board on top contains all the image processing logic & control functions.

Mainboard
Mainboard

The other side of the mainboard holds the processing chipset. This is probably one of the biggest flip-chip BGA packages I’ve ever seen, the DDP2000. Along with the DAD1000 on the right, these format & send the image data to the DLP chip, via the large white header.

Main PCB Removed
Main PCB Removed

After the mains PCB is removed from the chassis, the rest of the light engine is visible. The DLP is hidden on the left, behind the large heatsink & interface PCB. The light engine is spread out a lot more on this projector, across the entire front of the unit.

Light Engine
Light Engine

A closeup of the light engine shows the back of the phase sensor for the colourwheel, and the mounting brackets for the optics.

Colourwheel
Colourwheel

The dichroic colourwheel is tucked into the gap between the lamphouse & the first optic.

PSU Section
PSU Section

Hiding at the back of the projector is the alloy frame holding the power supplies & cooling ducts.

DC PSU & Lamp Ballast
DC PSU & Lamp Ballast

After removing the brackets, the DC power supply & the lamp ballast are visible. Since this projector uses a UHP arc lamp, the DC power supply which has the usual low voltage outputs for the logic board, has an auxiliary output from the +340v rail after the PFC circuit that supplies power to the lamp ballast.

Lamp Ballast Control PCB
Lamp Ballast Control PCB

The lamp ballast is a pretty standard design, using an Osram control board.

Homogeniser & Lenses
Homogeniser & Lenses

After removing the top cover with the colourwheel, the main optic chain is visible. The usual mirror tunnel homogenizer at the start, with a convex & aspheric lens on the left.

Lamphouse Thermal Cutout
Lamphouse Thermal Cutout

The lamphouse has a last-resort thermal cutout to shut the ballast down if the cooling fans fail. These lamps output some serious heat, and likely wouldn’t last longer than a couple of minutes without cooling.

DLP Optics
DLP Optics

The final turning optics before the DLP chip are hidden in the Mg casting of the light engine.

DLP
DLP

The DLP is the older type, with the large ceramic LGA package.

Projection Lens
Projection Lens

After the DLP, the light is routed through the objective lens, to the screen. This is the back of the lens inside the light engine.

Failed Optic
Failed Optic

And here is the main problem with the projector – the last lens in the optical chain before the DLP chip has been roasted by the intense light flux from the lamp. Unfortunately NEC cheaped out on this one – it’s the only optic in the machine that isn’t made of glass. This was likely caused by some contamination on the lens, which starts the process of absorbing light on the surface. The resulting heat then causes discolouring of the lens, which absorbs more heat. A chain reaction ensues, ending in the lens completely destroying itself.

Autofocus
Autofocus

The projection lens has a couple of sensors, for the focus & zoom, along with a focus motor. This is driven by feedback from a distance sensor in the base so no manual focusing is required.