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IC Decap – TDA3606 Multi Regulator With Battery Sense

This is a chip aimed at the automotive market – this is a low power voltage regulator for supplying power to microcontrollers, for instance in a CD player.

TDA3606 Die
TDA3606 Die

The TDA3606 is a voltage regulator intended to supply a microprocessor (e.g. in car radio applications). Because of low voltage operation of the application, a low-voltage drop regulator is used in the TDA3606. This regulator will switch on when the supply voltage exceeds 7.5 V for the first time and will switch off again when the output voltage of the regulator drops below 2.4 V. When the regulator is switched on, the RES1  and RES2 outputs (RES2 can only be HIGH when RES1 is HIGH) will go HIGH after a fixed delay time (fixed by an external delay capacitor) to generate a reset to the microprocessor. RES1 will go HIGH by an internal pull-up resistor of 4.7 kΩ, and is used to initialize the microprocessor. RES2 is used to indicate that the regulator output voltage is within its voltage range. This start-up feature is built-in to secure a smooth start-up of the microprocessor at first connection, without uncontrolled switching of the regulator during the start-up sequence. All output pins are fully protected. The regulator is protected against load dump and short-circuit (foldback
current protection). Interfacing with the microprocessor can be accomplished by means of a battery Schmitt-trigger and output buffer (simple full/semi on/off logic applications). The battery output will go HIGH when the battery input voltage exceeds the HIGH threshold level.

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eBay Special – LED Disco Light With Built In MP3 Player

Here’s an eBay oddity – it’s got the same light & lens mechanism as the cheap “disco light” style bulbs on eBay, but this one is battery powered & has a built in MP3 player.

MP3 Disco Light
MP3 Disco Light

This device simply oozes cheapness. The large 4″ plastic dome lens sits on the top above the cheap plastic moulding as a base, which also contains the MP3 player speaker.

Controls
Controls

There are few controls on this player, the volume buttons are combined with the skip track buttons, a long press operates the volume control, while a short press skips the tracks. Several options for getting this thing to play music are provided:

  • Bluetooth – Allows connection from any device for bluetooth audio
  • USB – Plugging in a USB flash drive with MP3 files
  • SD Card – Very similar to the USB flash drive option, just a FAT32 formatted card with MP3 files
  • Aux – There’s no 3.5mm jack on this unit for an audio input, instead a “special” USB cable is supplied that is both used to charge the built in battery & feed an audio signal. This is possible since the data lines on the port aren’t used. But it’s certainly out of the ordinary.
Top Removed
Top Removed

The top comes off with the removal of a single screw in the centre of the lens. The shaft in the centre that holds the lens is attached to a small gear motor under the LED PCB. There’s 6 LEDs on the board, to form an RGB array. Surprisingly for a very small battery powered unit these are bright to the point of being utterly offensive.

Mainboard
Mainboard

Here’s the mainboard removed from the plastic base. There’s not much to this device, even with all the options it has. The power switch is on the left, followed by the Mini-B USB charging port & aux audio input. The USB A port for a flash drive is next, finishing with the µSD slot. I’m not sure what the red wire is for on the left, it connects to one of the pins on the USB port & then goes nowhere.

Audio Amplifier
Audio Amplifier

The audio amplifier is a YX8002D, I couldn’t find a datasheet for this, but it’s probably Class D.

Main Chipset
Main Chipset

Finally there’s the main IC, which is an AC1542D88038. I’ve not been able to find any data on this part either, it’s either a dedicated MP3 player with Bluetooth radio built in, or an MCU of some kind.The RF antenna for the Bluetooth mode is at the top of the board.
Just behind the power switch is a SOT23-6 component, which should be the charger for the built in Lithium Ion cell.

Lithium Ion Cell
Lithium Ion Cell

The cell itself is a prismatic type rated in the instructions at 600mAh, however my 1C discharge test gave a reading of 820mAh, which is unusual for anything Li-Ion based that comes from eBay 😉
There is cell protection provided, it’s under the black tape on the end, nothing special here.

The main issue so far with this little player is the utterly abysmal battery life – at full volume playing MP3s from a SD card, the unit’s current draw is 600mA, with the seizure & blindness-inducing LEDs added on top, the draw goes up to about 1200mA. The built in charger is also not able to keep up with running the player while charging. This in all only gives a battery life of about 20 minutes, which really limits the usability of the player.

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Ferguson A10RWH Portable Colour TV Teardown

Back Removed
Back Removed

Here’s the other TV that was picked up from the local water point having been put of to be recycled. This one is much newer than the Thorn TV, a 10″ colour version from Ferguson.

RCA 27GDC85X CRT
RCA 27GDC85X CRT

The colour CRT used is an RCA branded one, 27GDC85X.

Power Inputs
Power Inputs

Like the other TV, this one is dual voltage input, mains 240v & 12v battery. This TV is a factory conversion of a standard 240v AC chassis though.

HV PSU
HV PSU

The 12v power first goes into this board, which looked suspiciously like an inverter. Measuring on the output pins confirmed I was right, this addon board generates a 330v DC supply under a load, but it’s not regulated at all, under no load the output voltage shoots up to nearly 600v!

Live Chassis
Live Chassis

I’ve not seen one of these labels on a TV for many years, when back in the very old TV sets the steel chassis would be used to supply power to parts of the circuitry, to save on copper. Although it doesn’t have a metal chassis to actually become live, so I’m not sure why it’s here.

Main PCB
Main PCB

The main PCB is much more integrated in this newer TV, from the mid 90’s, everything is pretty much taken care of by silicon by this point.

Main Microcontroller
Main Microcontroller

This Toshiba µC takes care of channel switching & displaying information on the CRT. The tuner in this TV is electronically controlled.

PAL Signal Processor
PAL Signal Processor

The video signal is handled by this Mitsubishi IC, which is a PAL Signal Processor, this does Video IF, Audio IF, Chroma, & generates the deflection oscillators & waveforms to drive the yoke.

CRT Adjustments
CRT Adjustments

There are some adjustments on the CRT neck board for RGB drive levels & cutoff levels. This board also had the final video amplifiers onboard, which drive the CRT cathodes.